Posts Tagged ‘Tucson’

ToGo Bike Sharing

December 1st, 2017 by samhughesinn

ToGo Bike Share Image result for photo togo bike share bikes

In late November the ToGo bike sharing program became a fun Tucson attraction only a bit less exciting than the Tucson Streetcar; it should prove popular with visitors as well as locals. No need to make arrangements through a local bicycle shop for an often expensive, but sleek trail bike or racing bike. If you aren’t too interested in fancy but just need wheels to look around town, this program will satisfy a lot of users.

Public bike sharing allows users to access bicycles located at a network of self-serve stations for short trips 24 hours a day and 7 days of the week. The bike itself may look more like the one you gave your middle school child. Painted a bright yellow, they are described as “hulking” and weigh 50 lbs. (according to Shift Transit, hired to run the system). Users report their ease of access and respectable speed on the road despite their heft.

The bicycles have lights fore and aft for visibility, good adjustable brakes and a small basket & bungee cord to allow for shopping stops.

The ToGo bike is Uber-like in that it has a smart phone app (CycleFinder in Apple iTunes and Google Play Store) which allows the renter to find available bikes and empty docking stations. If you don’t use a smart phone, Shift Transit offers daily passes for $8 at stations with payment kiosks or online here. This one is ideal for visitors, tourist & short term users. A monthly pass is also available for longer term visitors.

Tucson has 330 bikes docked in 36 stations around the city. One is located only six blocks from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast, directly in front of the long standing neighborhood friendly, Bob Dobbs bar/restaurant and Rincon Market.  Information on how to use and where to find the new ToGo bikes can be found here.

And for the short term, ‘Every Tuesday in December, 2017, you can participate in Free Ride Tuesdays. You can check out a bike for free for unlimited 30 minute rides’.

Summer in Tucson

August 9th, 2016 by samhughesinn

Monsoon Season

Storm Clouds

Storm clouds forming

People living in colder parts of the country are always anxious to hear horror stories about summer in Tucson but the subject of Monsoon Season only comes up when it’s so hot here no one is very eager to come experience it with us.  Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast has now endured 16 monsoon seasons and is half way through the 17th. We love monsoon.

In our first year of bed & breakfast business Tucson experienced the earliest arrival of monsoon season in history, June 17. Until a few years ago, the arrival of monsoon was calculated on the dew point reaching 55 degrees or more for three consecutive days. The rain almost always began after that third day. Now monsoon season has been designated June 15 until September 30, whether it’s dry or wet, and a more average first rainfall occurs around the first week of July.

Some visitors think we exaggerate the intensity of monsoon storms because they experience heavy rains throughout the year in their own home states. But monsoon can be either hours of gentle rainfall or it can produce violent winds that uproot trees and down power lines. Thousands of lightning strikes can cause fires to flare up in multiple locations and create hazardous conditions for people on the ground. Flooding fills our usually empty river beds to overflowing, and even some unlucky houses in low lying areas. On the campus of the University of Arizona you’ll find metal barricades across the step-down areas of some buildings to help keep the water from rushing under the doors.. People who live here love the frequent showers especially since they often cause the temperature to drop 25 or 30 degrees in minutes. Then our famous “dry heat” is replaced by the not so welcome “humidity”.

Downpour

First monsoon rain 2016.

Tucson receives half of its yearly rainfall during monsoon season; at least that’s the hoped for outcome, and so far 2016 appears to be on track. Storm clouds build up in enormous and beautiful designs and can appear any time of the day. A perfect blue sky can suddenly turn dark as night and claps of thunder can build slowly to ear shattering intensity in minutes. It is dangerous and exciting at the same time bringing a welcome change from the 100 degree days of June, at least for short periods of time..

Lightning

Lightning strikes

A recurring feature of monsoon season is Arizona’s “Stupid Motorist Law“. If a driver goes around a barricade on a flooded street and becomes stranded, he/she can be charged for being rescued. And yet a number of drivers attempt this maneuver every year and in some cases with disastrous results when the car is swept away..

Monsoon season is full of drama, from the first Cumulonimbus clouds poking up over the mountain tops, & the heavy rainfalls, to some of the most beautiful sunsets on earth.

Monsoon sunset

Sunset monsoon season

 

 

LOCATION, LOCATION

March 9th, 2016 by samhughesinn

Location, Location

Texas home

Finding a great place to live is all about location, location. Once you’ve chosen a state, a destination, either long term or just for a certain season, then the next step is to choose someone in Real Estate whom you can trust to find just exactly what you have in mind.

Two fabulous locations are Tucson, AZ and Grapevine, TX. The latter town is the location of Dallas/Ft. Worth Airport but Grapevine is not Dallas. It’s much smaller and more livable than the big city and has the advantage, like Tucson, of being only a few minutes’ drive from the airport.

In 1843 General Sam Houston attempted to forge a treaty at Grape Vine Springs, and  invited American Indian tribes to sign a peace treaty; and although the Indians arrived several weeks late, the Treaty of Birds Fort was signed opening North Texas for settlement. By November of 1845 settlers had arrived in the area now known as Grapevine. True to its name, Grapevine is a grape growing region and proudly serves Texas varieties at the wine bars located in downtown. This is also a great shopping area for locals and tourists with many smart little shops along its main street. The town as it is today is reminiscent of early 19th century American towns and Grapevine has actively worked to enhance its downtown business area.

Downtown Grapevine, TX

Downtown Grapevine, TX

During the Christmas season it is so beautiful you almost believe in Santa Claus again.
Grapvine paradeChristmas Tree GrapevineCottage Grapevine

Of course dozens of towns make up the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and a trusted real estate agent in the area, who also calls Grapevine home, is Keely Brown. Keely is associated with Keller-Williams Realty in Southlake, TX. Office:817-865-8771 Cell:847-722-1928 so if you are planning a relocation to that area, give her a call. She can also direct you to a Keller Williams agent in Tucson if you would like to find a place here.kwbusinesscard Dallas/Ft. Worth and Tucson International Airport have daily flights back and forth and Dallas is one of the places that visitors to Tucson often land in first since direct flights from Tucson to other parts of the country are not as frequently available.

And if you’re looking for real estate in Tucson, be sure to make Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast your place to stay while you look for more permanent housing.

Tucson Festival of Films

September 1st, 2015 by samhughesinn

Tucson Festival of TilmA new player in the crowded field of local film festivals will be the Tucson Festival of Films, (sponsored by Cox Communications) to be held in the Temple of Music & Art,the grandly

Arizona Theater Company

Temple of Music & Art

named 1920‘s era performing arts theater which also houses the Arizona Theater Company at 330 S. Scott Avenue. From October 8 – 10, films chosen from eight of the longest-running Tucson film festivals will be shown.

A selection of film shorts, plus musical & filmmaker guests will also be announced soon. But for now the lineup of films include the following (according to the Arizona Daily Star):

Sounds of Tucson, Presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Tucson Film & Music Festival, this is a 63 minute documentary describing the “mix of South American music & American Rock” which has been attracting musicians to Tucson for many years.

Güeros, (presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Tucson Cine México) is a comedy which won five Ariel awards in Mexico plus Best First Feature at the Berlin Film Festival. The is described as a “cool, retro, black and white portrait of Mexico City” and of three young men trying to find their purpose and futures in a city of many millions of people.

The 40th anniversary screening of Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore will be presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Loft Film Fest. It was filmed here in Tucson and southern Arizona so long time residents will recognize the shopping center, Monterey Village, the Chicago Music Store and the now closed Longhorn Bar & Grill in Amado.This 1974 hit movie stars some still familiar faces – Ellen Burstyn, Kris Kristofferson, Harvey Keitel, Diane Ladd & Jodie Foster.

Death In The Desert, presented by Tucson Festival and Arizona underground Film Festival, is based on the life story of Ted Binion, the heir to the Binion’s Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, the original home of the World Series of Poker.His colorful career included drugs & connections to the mob and ultimately ended tragically.

Landmine Goes Click is presented in cooperation with The Tucson Terrorfest. Described as the Arizona premiere of a film about 3 American tourists backpacking through European Georgia. Time to bring out the garlic and a big cross I think.

Maína, from the Festival of Film along with Native Eyes Film Showcase, has won 3 American Indian Film Festival awards and concerns two early civilizations in America.

Dropkick by Tucson Festival and Arizona international Film Festival, is a comedy about a group of women rugby players and was shown in Tucson at the last Arizona International Film Festival. It features local actors and locations.

Tucson is a film friendly town all year and not just in the summer when the AC is turned on high. Watch the website for times and dates of each of these unusual film offerings in October.

Important Birthdays August 20

August 19th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Tucson celebrates two important birthdays on August 20 each year.

Tucson began with the fort Tucson Presidio San Agustin, founded on that date in 1775 and it stood through the 1880’s. Only a portion of the wall remains today on the original site as the city has grown up around it. A territorial museum with courtyard and exhibits from early Tucson history has been created on the spot at the corner of Washington & Court Street. It comes to life during Living History Days (the second Saturday of the month, October through April) with performers in period dress going about the duties of early daily life, baking bread, blacksmithing, etc. There is a self-guided tour of the museum including a munitions room, tower, commissary & living space for the soldiers who lived here then. An open Hohokam pit house is also featured. Winter hours are 10AM-4PM and an hour less in the summer.

1775 Birthday Tucson

Presidio San Agustin

A 240th birthday celebration is held annually with birthday cake, cannon fire & living history demonstrations along with local groups and dignitaries making an appearance. Check the website for information about upcoming events and exhibits.

 

Reid Park Baby Elephant

Nandi’s First Birthday

And the second important birthday this August 20 is the very first one for the Reid Park Zoo’s famous baby elephant, Nandi.  A special birthday breakfast will be held for her at 7AM, and tickets sold out very quikly. Another event will be held on August 22 where the public can watch Nandi receive birthday treats and sing Happy Birthday along with the staff. Nandi  is a big baby now, weighing more than 900 pounds, but somehow she still appears tiny next to her much larger brother and parents. If you missed her birthday she’ll still be available during regular zoo hours, usually 9AM to 4PM. Don’t miss a visit to this special baby.

Farmers’ Markets in Tucson

July 3rd, 2015 by samhughesinn

farmers market

Farmers Merket

All seasons, but especially in summer, you will find an abundance of farmers’ markets in Tucson.

Some operate in the morning and some in the evening to take advantage of the coolest parts of the day, although, on many days you’d be hard pressed to find the coolest part. Take a spray bottle of water, wear a hat and lots of sun screen and go out and find fabulous locally grown fruits and vegetables,

Chile Ristras

Chile Ristras

desert honey, baked goods and chile ristras (a ristra is an arrangement of drying chili pepper pods used for cooking or as a decorative item).You can find a market any day of the week but here are some of the better known ones.

Tucson Farmers’ Market at Maynards, 400 N. Toole Ave.- Located behind the restaurant, Maynard’s Market & Kitchen at the Old Train Station across the street from the Congress Hotel. Among the veggies & fruits you’ll also find locally made tortillas, tamales, baked goods, cheese, coffee, tea, salsa and many other goodies.Open Saturdays, April through October, 8 a.m. to Noon.

Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market at Mercado San Agustin – 100 S. Avenida del Convento. This the last stop on the trolley line and boasts a bakery (try their doughnuts), several shops, a commercial kitchen, some yummy Mexican food and a lovely restaurant, Agustin Kitchen. You’ll find a big selection here too, along with honey, nuts, plants & flowers. Open evening hours, 4-7 p.m. Thurdays. Phone 622-0525, ext 7262.

paprika-65270_640

El Pueblo Farmers Market – El Rio Health center parking lot, 101 W Irvington Rd.Their offerings include eggs, herbs, vegetables and honey. Open Mondays, 3-5 p.m., phone 520-882-3313 for information.

Friday Farmers’ Market at Broadway Village – 2836 E.Broadway. featuring all of the above plus seafood (we don’t know where this might come from but it’s different). Open 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

St. Philip’s Plaza Farmers’ Market, 4280 N. Campbell Ave. Voted Best of Tucson, 2014 (Tucson Weekly) and for good reason. It’s one of the biggestmarkets in Southwestern Arizona and supports a

diverse group of local farmers. It’s surrounded by an early Tucson shopping area featuring many fabulous shops in a beautiful setting. This one is about eight minutes north on Campbell from Sam Hughes Inn bed & breakfast. Open Saturdays & Sundays, 8 a.m. – Noon.Farmers' Market logo

Prickly Pear

Prickly Pear Cactus Tuna

June in Tucson

June 1st, 2015 by samhughesinn

June in Tucson is, perhaps, the cruelest month. That’s especially true this year because last month was wonderfully mild. When 100 degree temperatures return, Tucson’s residents have to become creative and develop tough skins because they know there will be many, many more days like this one. So, resident or visitor, here are some things to do in June that will help build up endurance for the hot days and nights to follow.

Movies Under the Stars

Three locations are offering evening outdoor movies for people who want to enjoy being outside after sunset.

outdoor theater

Demeester Performance Center

Every other Friday Reid Park’s Demeester Performing Arts Pavillion, 900 S. Randolph Way, is hosting free admission movies. Some bench seats are available but most people prefer to bring a blanket or a folding chair & sit on the grassy hillside. June 19th’s show is Shrek, a favorite with families with children .Food trucks are nearby to satisfy hunger & thirst.

La Placita

Every Thursday evening beginning at about 7:30, Cinema La Placita at 100 S. Church Avenue, presents oldie but goodie movies on its patio. Seats are available at tables scattered around the patio and some bench seating, but to be assured a good seat you can always bring your own. A $3 charge includes popcorn. June 4 will have Private Benjamin starring Goldie Hawn, June 11, A Shot in the Dark with the never to be forgotten, Peter Sellers, and on June 19, King Kong (the 1933 version) and June 25th, Dr. Stranglove (Peter Sellers again). Refreshments are also available at the restaurants of La Placita.

And for a real change of pace in outdoor movies, the next Movie Under the Stars event will be 7:30 p.m. June 26 at East Lawn Palms Cemetery, 5801 E. Grant Road. Movies are projected on an inflatable screen. Watch the newspaper, Tucson.com, for the name of the next production. Bring blanket for seating although some chairs will be set up and concessions will be open. Sounds a little creepy but it’s a Tucson Thing now that the drive-ins are all gone. Seating is on grassy lawn not on grave sites.

Art Center Offerings in June

Zac Harmon Guitar

Zac Harmon Guitar

 

The Sea of Glass Center – Center for the Arts, 330 E. 7th Street, an unusual indoor venue, has scheduled three very different events in June. On June 19th, Zac Harmon (called International Blues Ambassador), with his 4 piece band, presents a concert at 7:3PM. A dinner/concert package is available. Tickets available online at the website and read more about Zac’s blues career beginning in Jackson, MS..

 

Documentary with speaker

One Track Heart Promo

Saturday, June 20 at 7:00 PM, the documentary, “One Track Heart:The Story of Krishna Das”  will follow the speaker, Jivananda dasa Vanacarif of ISKCON, describing the basic philosophies of Hinduism. He has traveled the world lecturing and sharing the word of his favorite guru. The documentary describes the evolution of rock musician turned spiritual leader, Jeffrey Kagel,(Krishna Das) who in 1970 turned his back on rock stardom to pursue a personal search for spiritual fulfillment. Check website for tickets and more information on both men.

 

Dalai LamaAnd on Saturday, June 27, Sea of Glass will showcase the film, The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle For Freedom. The Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual leader, has lived in exile for most of his life trying to reach a compromise with China.The struggle continues to this day. Again, information and tickets can be found on the website along with a trailer from the film. Tickets purchased in advance are less expensive than day of the show tickets.

And enjoy lovingly prepared, locally sourced & reasonably priced plant based food items at The Food for Ascension Cafe, located next door, before or after these shows..

 

Music Scene

band

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

 

The historic Fox Theatre announces these special events in June all starting at 7:30 PM: June 6, Nitty, Gritty Dirt Band (country/folk), Thursday, June 11, Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn (Americana), Saturday, June 13, Phil Wickham (Christian), and Friday, June 19, Art Garfunkel (super famous singer/songwriter).

Phil Wickham

Phil Wickham

 

Garfunkel

Art Garfunkel

Duo

Fleck & Washburn

Summer in Tucson

May 24th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Summer Sun

Summer in Tucson:

Arizona enjoys more than 300 sunny days a year and in the summer months it’s important to find ways to endure and also enjoy, summer in Tucson. A little creativity is necessary and it’s always good to remember that even though it may be beastly hot outside, it will never prevent you from pursuing activities the way winter in colder climes does. You don’t have to shovel it and you don’t have to scrape it off your windshield and if you’re lucky, summer will only last until mid-October. After that, it’s heavenly here. You just have to find places and things to do that keep you out of the blazing sun during the hottest hours of the day.

Until the middle of May the nights and mornings in Tucson are cool and pleasant. As June, the nastiest month, approaches, night and morning begin to come close to daytime heat, minus the sunshine. Air Conditioning is our salvation, in the house, in the car, in stores & theaters; it’s everywhere you want to be. You just have to figure out how to navigate from air conditioned place to air conditioned place and remember to drink lots of water.

One new reason to spend part of summer in Tucson is the Summer in the City Discount Card. About 130 merchants in the five shopping and entertainment districts are offering discounts up to 50 percent with the card.You can order it online for $5 and there is no limit to the number of times you can use it. Stay at Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast and two people can use the inn’s cards to receive discounts on food & drink, to purchase something special, or take a yoga class. The possibilities for savings are at least 130. Cards are valid through the end of August. Check the website for the list of merchants participating.

COOL PURSUITS:

Mt. LemmonMt. Lemmon Sky Center
has the largest public viewing telescope in the Southwest. They offer nightly presentations by gifted astronomers at an always cool altitude. Check the website or phone 520-626-8122, Mt. Lemmon at any time of day will be considerably cooler than Tucson.

DeGrazia Gallery

DeGrazia Gallery

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun occupies ten acres created and built by late Tucson artist Ted DeGrazia. Multiple cleverly conceived buildings house the huge collection of originals: oils, pastels, metalwork, pottery, ceramics & sculpture all designed by this incredibly talented artist. Some of the interesting creations are outside but you can spend almost all the time indoors in the labyrinth of rooms housing his works. 6300 N. Swan Rd. 520-299-9191.

La Vida Fantastica

Unknown Artist, Kuna Culture

The Tucson Museum of Art at 140 N. Main Ave. in downtown Tucson, is located in the El Presidio Historic Block of early Tucson architecture.. This summer will feature several interesting exhibits. The WPA Connection: Selections from the Modern Art Collection and La Vida Fantastica: Selections from the American Folk Art Collection. Along with its vast permanent collection  you can spend many happy hours in the cool of the museum and grab a bite to eat at their yummy Cafe’ a la C’art. No sweat guaranteed!

Summer 2015 Exhibit

Summer Exhibit Mini Time Museum of Miniatures

The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures offers 10,000 square feet of air conditioned wonder as you peek into the fascinating tiny world of hundreds of different miniature art displays. Antique & contemporary miniatures are sure to please young and old. Closed on Mondays so check the website for hours on the other days. 4455 E. Camp Lowell Dr., 520-881-0606.

Field, Pima Air & Space

Pima Air & Space Museum

Pima Air & Space Museum has five air cooled hangers featuring commercial, military and civil aviation exhibits. You can also enjoy a toasty tram tour of its 80 acres of famous and not so famous aircraft and/or tour the Boneyard with its hundreds of mummy wrapped aircraft lined up by type. These tours are true examples of a Summer in Tucson experience and are not likely to be cool, so bring a spray bottle of water or a hand fan if you decide to indulge. 520-574-0462

Queen Mine

Queen Mine

 

And if you’re spending a few days of Summer in Tucson and want to venture a little further out, visit the cooler old world town of Bisbee (at an altitude of more than 5500 feet), and its Queen Mine,once a busy working copper mine. The mine is an always chilly 47 degrees so you’ll need a jacket. You’ll ride the mine train deep inside the tunnel while wearing miner’s hats, slickers and lanterns. The tour lasts about an hour & fifteen minutes. Call 866-432-2071 for reservations.

 

Cave interior

Cave stalactites, stalagmites

And for another cool subterranean adventure, don’t miss Kartchner Caverns State Park to witness a still forming, water dripping, perfect cave, undisturbed by man until its discovery in 1974 and featuring awesome stalactites and stalagmites. Great care is taken that nothing harms the interior of this cave so no cameras, or equipment of any kind, purses, backpacks, etc. – all must be tucked into lockers before the tours begin.Reservations are a must so check the website to make online future or same day arrangements. For those wanting to experience the cave the way its discoverers did, Helmet and Headlamp tours are also available but only on Saturdays. Kartchner Caverns Park is located near Benson, AZ, about an hour & a half from Tucson. (520) 586-2283

 

FOOD

April 22nd, 2015 by samhughesinn

Barbecue grillThe University of Arizona School of Anthropology celebrates 100 years since its inception with a series of free food lectures. Sponsored in part by the Marshall Foundation, this series explores the area of food & nutrition and its relationship to man and to our perception of ourselves, as it began thousands of years ago.

Up in Smoke: The History of Barbecue will be presented on Thursday, April 23, 2015, 7:00 – 8:30pm, in Social Sciences 100. This free lecture will be hosted by Steven Raichlen in a keynote address at the University of Arizona Social Science Auditorium. (See university map for locations). Steven Raichlen is an award winning author, journalist, lecturer, TV host & novelist. He has a best selling book and TV shows, Primal Grill & Barbecue University on PBS and he has lectured on the history of barbecue at the Smithsonian, the Library of Congress & Harvard University. So, whatever you think you know about throwing a steak of the grill will pale next to this expert’s bank of cooking knowledge

The Human Appetite: A Symposium on Food and Anthropology will be presented Friday, April 24, 1 – 4pm in Haury 216 (see U of A map). Food is the story of human life and this lecture will explore how we think about food from subsistence strategies to nutrition to the role of food in our daily lives.A panel of graduate students in the School of Anthropology will discuss aspects of “how we are what we eat”. Presentations will include the Heritage of Butchery, Early Roman Animal Sacrifice & Consumption, East African diet and identity, Food Security, White Mountain Apache Food Sovereignty and the Biography of Grain.

10,000 Years of Eating in the Southwest, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 10am – 3pm, Arizona State museum lawn. (See U of A map).This lecture covers the changes in food and eating in the Southwest over the past 10,000 years with demonstration booths staffed by students & faculty of the School of Anthropology.

Food Tour: Local Foods from Tucson’s Past, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 11am – 3pm, departs from Arizona State Museum lawn. Cost $25 per person. Sign up at https://uafoundation.org/NetCommunity/localfoods before 9:00 pm, Thursday, April 23. The tour will visit three locations representing Tucson farmers & their local crops at different points during the past 4,000 years. One is a village site on Tumamoc Hill where Native American farmers raised corn about 400 B.C. Below it are the remains of fields where farmers planted agave & pits where they roasted their harvest in A.D.1250.

You can reach these lectures in about a 20 minute walk from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast or park in any of the university garages listed on the map.

Tucson Artists’ Open Studios

April 14th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Tucson Artists’ Open Studios

Tucson Artists' Open Studios

 

The Arts Brigade event,Tucson Artists’ Open Studios comes to town next weekend, April 18 & 19, 2015 from 11AM to 5PM. This annual event will showcase more than 120 artists, and 80 studios and galleries exhibiting the work of these many multi-talented local artists. You don’t have to go to a major US city to find fabulous artistic talent; it’s right here in our own backyards.

Open studio 1

The incredible variety of artistic offerings available include paintings, wooden carvings, ceramics, sculpture, bronze work, historic preservation miniatures, oil paintings, printmaking, photography, intaglio, watercolors, pen & ink drawings, mixed media collage, steel & stainless steel work, clay, glass sculpture, jewelry, paper mâché, pottery, leather work, acrylic on canvas, handwoven wearable art, glass wind chimes, fiber arts, gelatin silver prints, vintage button jewelry, retablos, painted paper castings, graphite on paper, charcoal portraits, note cards, tile furniture and accessories, artisan toys, stone work and artist books. This is a wonderful time to find unique gifts for your own enjoyment or for the special people on your shopping list.

This is your opportunity to talk to the artist whose work you admire and see demonstrations of some of their work. For the tenth year, this artist initiated event invites the visitor into his or her creative space to see what moves them, the type of work they do and of course, to buy some of it..

Most destinations are in downtown Tucson and their locations and the names of all the artists are listed by zip code at TucsonOpenStudios.com. More information and a map for the self guided tour can be found in the April issue of Zocalo Magazine/ on page 21. The magazine, which connects artists to the community can be found free at over 350 locations around the city. Check their website for the digital version or to subscribe to the magazine or to an email list of artistic events throughout the year.

Pink Door Gallery

Art by Ester Rogoway
Old Artisans Shops
Pink Door Gallery

Old Town Artisans , The Pink Door Studio and Gallery, 201 N Court Ave.,Tucson AZ.85701
520-444-6481     estherogoway@gmail.com

The Pink Door Studio and Gallery is a gem found in the heart of the historic Presidio. The Pink Door Studio and Gallery features the finest works of art in original oil, acrylic, watercolor, contemporary sculpture, art glass, ceramics, hand-painted furniture, and exquisite jewelry. The collection includes those with world-renowned reputations as well as cutting edge emerging artists. The Pink Door Gallery and Studio is committed to excellence in its art and in providing you with personal, professional service. Located in The Old Town Artisan building, The Pink Door Studio and Gallery provides a wonderful setting to view one of a kind art and jewelry.

This month , April 18th and 19th, 11:am to 5:00PM, we will be open for The Tucson  Studio Tour.  Please join us for a day of fun and art. Several of our artists will be in attendance, and  demonstrating  their talents. Featured artist: Esther Rogoway 

There will be music and food at  La Cocina Restaurant located on the patio
Seven Galleries and Shops & two Restaurants are located at Old Town Artisans.

 

Craft Beer Microbreweries

February 13th, 2015 by samhughesinn

beer

Craft Beer

The first ever, Tucson Craft Beer Crawl, will be held Saturday, February 21, 12 Noon to 4:00 PM and will include 7 Craft Beer Microbreweries representing a number of local craft beers.

There has been an explosion of sorts in microbreweries in Tucson in the past few years and this event will cap Arizona Beer Week (Feb. 12-21).

Tickets can be purchased online for $38 or at the door for $45 and attendees will receive a wristband, a map of participating breweries, and a 5 ounce sampling glass. The goal is to connect beer lovers with local pubs and craft beers unique to Arizona and Tucson.

Per Wikipedia the term “craft beer” is typically applied to breweries that are much smaller than large-scale corporate breweries and are independently owned. Such breweries are generally characterized by their emphasis on quality, flavor and brewing technique Tucson’s participating breweries include Ten 55 Brewing, Borderlands Brewing, Pueblo Vida Brewing, SanTan Brewing, Dragon Brewing Co, Thunder Canyon Brewery, Grand Canyon Brewing Co., Barrio Brewing, Sonoran Brewing Co., Old Bisbee Brewing Co., Huss Brewing, Iron John’s Brew Co, and O.H.S.O. Each company will bring its best brews to sample at Hotel Congress, Thunder Canyon Brewery, R Bar, Pueblo Vida, Playground, Borderlands Brewery and Tap & Bottle.

The hope is that people will develop a sense of community in the new downtown neighborhood while enjoying a moving party. Some of the proceeds will be donated to Watershed Management Group, an organization offering “adaptive & collaborative approach to developing sustainable solutions for the water and environmental issues in Tucson” (Zócalo Magazine, February, 2015).

The afternoon timing will insure that the beer crawl becomes a real community event with people coming together to discover downtown and hopefully bring their friends to enjoy some of the local pubs as well. Coincidentally a bill will be introduced in the upcoming Arizona legislative session to allow microbreweries to keep restaurants and pubs as they grow.

The current law says breweries producing less than 40,000 barrels a year are “microbreweries.” Once they top that number, they become “producers.” As a microbrewery they are allowed some self-distribution rights and the operation of restaurants and pubs and some of these smaller places would like to expand. The Arizona Craft Brewers Guild says the law is not clear regarding off-site restaurants and pubs when a brewer tops 40,000 barrels. Tucson brewers currently have on site restaurant/pub arrangements but could be affected by this law in the future. Arizona Beer Week happens every February from Flagstaff to Tucson and is a celebration of craft beer throughout the state.The Great Tucson Beer Festival is tentatively scheduled October 31, 2015.

Tucson Festival of Books

February 8th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Book Festival logo

Tucson Festival of Books

The Tucson Festival of Books began just 6 years ago when 350 authors presented 300 programs to 50,000 attendees after two years of planning and with high hopes for the future. By 2014 this event, spread across the University of Arizona Mall and hosted hundreds of authors, numerous tent and vendor offerings, hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors, side events for children and family members and attracted an audience of some 130,000 visitors in two days. Even larger attendance is expected in 2015.

Since its humble beginnings in 2009, the festival has contributed more than $1,000,000 to local literacy programs. This year’s Tucson Festival of Books, March 14 & 15, 2015 will again present over 350 authors, many of them famous,and each one of them will take part in special workshops or conversations, sometimes alone or in tandem with another author or as part of a panel discussion. These conversations or presentations draw overflow audience attendance in many rooms and auditoriums throughout the university campus. The authors include writers of fiction & non fiction, science, art, history, biography, romance, mystery, fantasy, science fiction,cooking, philosophy,self help, medicine and every other genre you can imagine for every age group. There will be 5 different science “neighborhoods” to engage children as well as adults and will include renowned science authors & researchers.The festival offers programming for children and teens, panels by best-selling and emerging authors, a literary circus, culturally diverse programs, a poetry venue, exhibitor booths, several food courts, book signing by your favorite authors and, of course, thousands of books to discover and buy.

Vendor tents & crowd

Tucson Festival of Books

Approximately 40 different entertainment groups will also take part in the Festival of Books. This year the highlight will be a rock group called The Rock Bottom Remainders. This year’s best selling authors/musicians will be Amy Tan, Mitch Albom, Dave Barry, Scott Turow, Ridley Pearson, Greg Iles, Alan Zweibel and Sam Barry who will kick off the event on Friday night, March 13. The group’s name is based on the booksellers’ term for books that languish on the shelves so long they have to be dumped at a discount.

A few “professional” musicians will complete the group. The performance will be held the evening of March 13 in the University of Arizona Student Memorial Union from 8-9:30 PM.. Tickets are available online and going fast.

A wide variety of other events are planned including a panel discussion on the impact of concussions and traumatic brain injury.The panel will include  brothers Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada, the co-authors of “League of Denial,” the New York Times best-seller on the NFL’s efforts to cover up the link between football and brain damage. A sport’s analyst and a number of former NFL players will round out the panel.

Gail Sheehy of “Passages” fame, is among a team of journalists and social and political commentators participating in the Tucson Festival of Books, Also on board are Pulitzer Prize winner, James Risen, an investigative reporter for the New York Times, linguist and author Noam Chomsky, who has written more than 100 books, Pulitzer winner, Dan Fagin, author of “Toms River”, (exploring the high number of childhood cancers in a New Jersey town), Oscar Martinez, author of “The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail,”  and Philip Caputo, a reporter for the Chicago Tribune for 9 years, author of the 2009 novel, “Crossers”, set on the Mexico-Arizona border.

A host of other authors, famous as well as up and coming, will present more events than a person attending both days would be able to take in. Check the website for the Tucson Festival of Books, for a Bookmarked Events tool which allows a viewer to choose events and print a personal schedule so that you won’t miss the people you most want to see.

Books, Books & More Books

Books, Books & More Books

The Festival is only a fifteen minute stroll from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast. You can park on site and walk to everything.

Major sponsors of the festival include the University of Arizona, The Arizona Daily Star newspaper, the University of Arizona Medical Center, Friend of the Festival donations, Cox Communications and other organizations and primary individual donors.

Mini Time Museum of Miniatures

January 27th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Catherine wearing diamond

Catherine the Great
with Orlov

The Mini Time Museum of Miniatures in Tucson, presents a special exhibit of replica diamonds displayed on miniature historical figures representing their original owners. The exhibit (beginning January 27, 2015 through April 19, 2015) features the work of two famous artists. The replica diamonds were created by Scott Sucher of Tijeras, New Mexico and the historic figures were designed by artist, George S. Stuart of Ojai, CA.

The exhibit, called Diamonds Are Forever (The Incredible Journeys of World-Famous Diamonds & the People Who Owned Them), comes to the Tucson Mini Time Museum of Miniatures courtesy of the Museum of Ventura County California, which developed and produced it. This exhibit tells the story of famous diamonds and their famous owners. Their stories are told with 18 quarter-life-size historical figures and 10 replica diamonds.

George Stuart has created more than 400 historic figures, famous and infamous, in incredible life like miniature sculptures. He also describes them in regular monologues presented near his home in Ventura, CA.

Scott Sucher, through exhaustive research, creates world famous, historically accurate diamond replicas for museums and educational purposes.

Louis XIV with diamond

Louis XIV – French Blue diamond tie tack

According to the Mini Time Museum of Miniatures website, the exhibit includes figures of Catherine the Great, Louis XIV, Napoleon and the Shah Jahan. The historic diamond replicas feature the Hope, the French Blue, Regent, Beau Sancy, the Koh-i-Noor, the Orlov and the Mirror of Portugal. Many of these jewels were incorporated into crowns, scepters, pendants & hair ornaments and were usually in the hands of royalty. However, over time, some have been lost, stolen or broken up and re-cut. Diamond connoisseurs will be familiar with all or most of these stones and will find the exhibit fascinating. Gem Show visitors will want to add this exhibit to their schedules during February for a great change of pace from shopping or selling.

The Mini Time Museum of Miniatures regular collection features over 275 miniature houses and box rooms in three main areas: the Enchanted Realm, History Gallery and Exploring the World. This is not just a destination for children; in fact many exhibits are better understood and appreciated by adults. You will never be too old to enjoy this wonderful museum. Many fine artists are represented and their work is perfection in every tiny detail, from real silverware & china in table settings to fine furniture, carpeting and paintings hanging on the small dollhouse walls. Many periods of history are replicated in the various houses and boxes, along with fantasy representations of fairy tales. You’ll find old and contemporary houses, houses from other countries, an airplane café, stores, western scenes, castles and re-creations of existing or formerly existing buildings. You’ll wish you could touch these tiny treasures but they are protected from harm yet beautifully displayed and lighted so that every small marvel can be easily observed.There are docent led and self guided tours to the Mini Time Museum of Miniatures and you will want to come back many times to revisit the permanent collection as well as to take advantage of the special temporary exhibits like Diamonds Are Forever.

The museum, although now in its sixth year of operation, still remains a hidden treasure, a Tucson Special Attraction. You’ll find the museum at 4455 E. Camp Lowell Drive in Tucson, about 20 minutes drive from downtown. Hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 9 AM – 4 PM. Sunday, Noon – 4 PM. Closed on Mondays and major holidays.

Historic figure photos and artist photos courtesy of Museum of Ventura County.

Scott Sucher

Scott Sucher

George Stuart

George Stuart

 

Nandi – Reid Park Zoo Baby Elephant

December 23rd, 2014 by samhughesinn

Nandi at 2 months

Nandi at 2 months

Reid Park Zoo & Baby Elephant Nandi

Reid Park zoo and its star attraction, the baby elephant, Nandi, are set to break attendance records in 2014. This was the first elephant birth for the zoo and has captured the attention of countless fans.

Nestled in the middle of bustling mid-town Tucson, the zoo has always been a tiny marvel. Once inside visitors forget that they are in the middle of a heavily populated city surrounded by highways and traffic. Its clever design makes a jungle-like oasis only about five minutes from the University of Arizona and a few minutes more to downtown Tucson. This year people waited anxiously knowing that a pregnant elephant was about to give birth. Nandi was born on August 20th but kept in a quiet area with her mother, Semba. Even a royal birth might not have been so closely watched as zoo staff kept a vigil 24 hours a day, until she was born. At night interns stayed up observing with night vision goggles for any signs of labor.

Weighing in at 245 lbs she seemed like a toy animal next to her mother who tipped the scales at more than 7,000 lbs. They were kept in seclusion for a month until the baby was healthy enough to be allowed in the viewing area. In December she weighed more than 500 lbs but still looks tiny next to the three adults and one 3 year old in the herd. All the elephants were rescued from Swaziland and came to Tucson via the San Diego Zoo after new construction greatly increased the size of the elephant enclosure. Her dad is Mabu and he weighs more than 8 tons. We’re not sure how they weigh elephants but we’ll take their word for it. The zoo opens at 9 am during the cool months and Nandi is usually on display until about 11:30 am. You won’t want to miss Nandi when you visit Tucson; it’s going to take her quite a few years to be as big as her parents, the three year old, and the other giant males.

Nandi's Extended Family

Nandi’s Family

Mom - Semba

Mom – Semba

The zoo’s small size makes it an ideal place to spend a few hours being amazed at the diversity of the animal world.

There are many other reasons to visit this gem of a zoo, which has a wide range of animals and birds big and small, including Herbie, the giant turtle (500 lbs. who could be as old as 100 years but he’s not talking.)

Herbie (photographer Jeff Whitlock

Herbie –  [photography, Jeff Whitlock, www.theonlinezoo.com]

Ample parking surrounds the zoo, just 2.5 miles from Sam Hughes Inn and next to the Randolph Park Golf Course, Tennis courts and directly opposite Edith Ball Adaptive pools (swimming & therapy pools heated and open year round) with UV protected circus tent style roof. You can bring a picnic lunch and eat in the park near a large man made lake with fountain and the usual visiting duck population.

 

Who is Sam Hughes?

September 11th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Who is Sam Hughes - Samuel C. Hughes

Samuel C. Hughes
August 28, 1829 – June 20, 1917

People occasionally ask about our Inn’s name, wondering: “Who is Sam Hughes?”

Well, Sam Hughes immigrated to the US from Wales in 1837, at the tender age of 8 years old, with his parents and 8 brothers and sisters.

Not long after settling in Pennsylvania, illness struck the family and rendered the nine Hughes children orphans. Sam Hughes was instrumental in caring for and seeing to the education of his siblings, even though he was still but a child and never attended a single day of formal school, himself.

Sam made his way to California for the Gold Rush in 1850 to seek his fortune – but fortune had a different idea and Sam Hughes contracted tuberculosis, a diagnosis that forced him to leave for drier, warmer country: the Arizona Territory.

The stagecoach trip almost killed him (this was 22 years before the arrival of the railroad!) and he arrived in Tucson more dead than alive – but not for long. After a few months recovery, Sam Hughes opened a butcher shop whose success was only checked by the Civil War.

The Confederates offered Union supporting Arizona residents the option of leaving town or being shot – Sam Hughes, ever practical, chose the former as the best option and returned to California until the close of the war.

Returning to Tucson after the war, Sam Hughes continued his butcher business, taking a partner, a wife, and numerous government contracts. He expanded his business into general merchandise, cattle ranching, and mining, forming Hughes, Stevens and Company.

Sam Hughes helped to incorporate the City of Tucson but refused the post of mayor, serving the city council as an alderman, instead. He later served as Pima County sheriff and county treasurer, and was appointed Arizona Territory’s adjutant-general.

One of Tucson’s wealthiest residents and an organizer for Tucson’s first bank, Sam Hughes was known as “Uncle Sam” for his philanthropy, donating land and money for churches and schools as well as to the poor. More famously, Sam Hughes was instrumental in establishing public education in the Territory, calling its success “the pride of my life.”

Sam Hughes died June 20, 1917 in Tucson. 11 years later, a new elementary school in one of Tucson’s first subdivisions was named after him and now you can find his name here and there all around the area, including our inn!

And now you know!

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