Posts Tagged ‘Sam Hughes’

Tucson Historic Neighborhoods

May 18th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Sam Hughes Historic Neighborhood

In 1994 Sam Hughes became one of the official Tucson Historic Neighborhoods; 31 have been designated by the National Register of Historic Places. Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast is a contributing member of this large group of neighborhoods which make up most of the city of Tucson. Many historic neighborhoods received their designations earlier but this one was named to honor the early Tucson settler of the same name.20150518_094907

The neighborhood sits just east of the University of Arizona and is bound by 4 major arteries north & south, Campbell (Kino) Parkway and Country Club Blvd. and on its east and west sides are Speedway & Broadway. Almost 600 homes in the 1 square mile district are considered historically significant and represent 16 essential types of architecture including Craftsman, Bungalow, and Mission Revival. Most have Spanish elements of design.

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It was developed between 1920 and the 1950‘s although there are a few homes of more recent vintage. Settler, Sam Hughes, was instrumental in establishing Tucson’s free public school system and the excellent elementary school also pays tribute by wearing his name.20150518_094826

Although this is basically a residential neighborhood it has enough businesses along its edges to make it a handy walk around neighborhood while still retaining its residential feeling. At least one full service grocery store is close at hand, plus several smaller markets, banks, drugstores and many restaurants.. Highlights are the close-by University of Arizona (with three splendid museums on campus), Himmel Park and a major bike route which cuts through the university from 3rd 20150517_174430Street Blvd. spanning the distance from Wilmot Road on the far east side, to downtown Tucson.

Bus transportation is abundant in all directions and a short walk takes a visitor to the new Streetcar line.Reid/Randolph Park is within walking distance with its tennis courts, heated year round pool, zoo, fountain pond, and picnic sites making the area seem far away from the noise and bustle of the city.

On the other end of the time spectrum of Tucson Historic Neighborhoods is the neighborhood of El Presidio where Tucson began as a Spanish Colonial outpost in 1776, and where most structures date from 1860 to the 1920‘s. Architecture is varied with Transformed Sonoran houses as well as the larger homes which for years were located on what was called Millionaires Row. In the name of “progress”, some mansions in this area were destroyed to make way for major highway construction. But its North Main Avenue is still one of the loveliest streets in town with many beautifully restored buildings serving as homes and offices.Courthouse-Front-11x1-529x360La-Placita-Close-01x-539x360

Early architecture

El Presidiio Neighborhood St. Augustine Cathedral

Sam Hughes is a midtown neighborhood while El Presidio is in downtown Tucson. Check the Tucson Historic Neighborhoods link as well as www.tucsonishome.com for detailed information about the growth of Tucson since 1776 and all the historic neighborhoods that have evolved since then..

 

 

Atanacia Hughes – Arizona Pioneer

November 27th, 2014 by samhughesinn

 Atanacia Hughes, early Tucson history

Wife of Sam Hughes

Atanacia Santa Cruz Hughes

Last month’s blog featured Sam Hughes, an original Tucson, AZ pioneer settler. This month we feature his wife, Atanacia Hughes – originally Atanacia Santa Cruz. Her family lived in Tucson when it was still part of Mexico. At the time of her birth in 1850 the area now known as the Presidio historic neighborhood, was a military garrison housing approximately 300 people. Indian raids were not uncommon in those days.

There were no schools or churches at that time so young women learned to sew, and keep house, but not much else. Atanacia Hughes’ parents died when she was very young and she lived with her sister. In 1862 at the age of 11 years & 7 months, Atanacia married the 29 year old Sam Hughes. The huge age difference was not a problem legally or for them and the marriage endured for 55 years until Sam’s death.

According to Hughes family members who stayed at Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast for a reunion years ago, at the time of their marriage, Atanacia Hughes didn’t speak English and Sam didn’t speak Spanish. During their long marriage she is reported to have given birth to fifteen children, eight of whom survived. Twelve of these children lived long enough to have been given names.

Atanacia Hughes died on November 12, 1934 and is buried in Holy Hope Cemetery in Tucson.

The Sam Hughes family home is still located at 223 N. Main St. at Washington Street, close to the Tucson Museum of Art. Its exterior is exactly as it was when the Hughes family lived in it although the insides are now apartments.

If you take the walking tour of Tucson, pick up a walking map called “The Turquoise Trail” at the Visitors Center at 100 S. Church Street. The Sam Hughes house is listed on the tour although there is no sign in front of the property.

Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast was named for Sam Hughes (the pioneer settler) and the historic neighborhood it resides in. Visitors here can find information about the life of Sam & Atanacia Hughes as well as photographs of them. Just as the University of Arizona is an easy walk from Sam Hughes, the Arizona Historical Society is also a short distance away and contains many artifacts from the Hughes life in Tucson.

Who is Sam Hughes?

September 11th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Who is Sam Hughes - Samuel C. Hughes

Samuel C. Hughes
August 28, 1829 – June 20, 1917

People occasionally ask about our Inn’s name, wondering: “Who is Sam Hughes?”

Well, Sam Hughes immigrated to the US from Wales in 1837, at the tender age of 8 years old, with his parents and 8 brothers and sisters.

Not long after settling in Pennsylvania, illness struck the family and rendered the nine Hughes children orphans. Sam Hughes was instrumental in caring for and seeing to the education of his siblings, even though he was still but a child and never attended a single day of formal school, himself.

Sam made his way to California for the Gold Rush in 1850 to seek his fortune – but fortune had a different idea and Sam Hughes contracted tuberculosis, a diagnosis that forced him to leave for drier, warmer country: the Arizona Territory.

The stagecoach trip almost killed him (this was 22 years before the arrival of the railroad!) and he arrived in Tucson more dead than alive – but not for long. After a few months recovery, Sam Hughes opened a butcher shop whose success was only checked by the Civil War.

The Confederates offered Union supporting Arizona residents the option of leaving town or being shot – Sam Hughes, ever practical, chose the former as the best option and returned to California until the close of the war.

Returning to Tucson after the war, Sam Hughes continued his butcher business, taking a partner, a wife, and numerous government contracts. He expanded his business into general merchandise, cattle ranching, and mining, forming Hughes, Stevens and Company.

Sam Hughes helped to incorporate the City of Tucson but refused the post of mayor, serving the city council as an alderman, instead. He later served as Pima County sheriff and county treasurer, and was appointed Arizona Territory’s adjutant-general.

One of Tucson’s wealthiest residents and an organizer for Tucson’s first bank, Sam Hughes was known as “Uncle Sam” for his philanthropy, donating land and money for churches and schools as well as to the poor. More famously, Sam Hughes was instrumental in establishing public education in the Territory, calling its success “the pride of my life.”

Sam Hughes died June 20, 1917 in Tucson. 11 years later, a new elementary school in one of Tucson’s first subdivisions was named after him and now you can find his name here and there all around the area, including our inn!

And now you know!

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