Posts Tagged ‘local’

Restaurants Found Only in Tucson

August 15th, 2015 by samhughesinn

Chain restaurants can be found in abundance in every city of a certain size but locally we are lucky to have a group of sophisticated restaurants found only in Tucson. Those featured here are, for the most part, elegant & unique restaurants where visitors will find original cuisine highlighting local food sources. Some belong to a group called Tucson Originals and some to another group called eatlocaltucson,

The underlying appeal of these restaurants is that they are locally owned and dedicated to, as much as possible, using food products locally grown and/or produced.

In a class all by itself, is the Arizona Inn at 2200 E. Elm St., a family owned and run luxury hotel/resort on any tourist’s “must see” list since the early 1930’s. Boasting all the amenities of a 5 Star Hotel/Resort, it has two dining rooms, Main Dining (inside and with a stricter dress code than most Tucson restaurants) and the Audubon Bar, which is casual and opens to the beautiful lawns and gardens on its patio facing side. Arizona inn menus offer a variety of taste treats from the small and reasonably priced items, to full dinners when price is not an object for the very special occasion. A brunch menu is offered on Saturday and Sunday. The inn is located just 1.6 miles directly north of Sam Hughes Inn, presenting a nice way to walk off a full meal if you’re staying here and eating there.

Special Event

Primavera Cooks 2015

Pastiche Modern Eatery, (also not far from Sam Hughes Inn), at 3025 North Campbell, has been part of the Tucson scene for many years and almost never disappoints with its variety of popular offerings that appeal to anyone who loves to eat out.

On September 9, 2015 Pastiche will be one of six “Restaurants found only in Tucson” participating in a yearly dinner event called Primavera Cooks,, Described as “possibly the most fun you will ever have at a nonprofit fundraising dinner” the meal will consist of a 4 or 5 course, wine paired fabulous evening out. Three of the restaurants have already had their fund raisers earlier in the summer. Sorry to have missed them.

Another restaurant still planning its Primavera dinner on August 30th, is Kingfisher. 2564 E Grant Rd. This perennial winner of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence is also proud of its specialty oyster menu. Plenty of seafood is on offer here (For 8 years Tucson Weekly has voted Kingfisher the Best Seafood Restaurant in town) along with a variety of meat dishes.

If you read this blog in time, Tavolino, an Italian “ristorante”at 2890 E. Skyline Drive will have its specialty dinner on Wednesday, August 19. On the regular menu you’ll find home-made pastas and signature pizzas made in their wood burning oven. Described as elegant but relaxed, Tavolino also has an excellent patio dining area.Late summer hours begin on Memorial Day. (This is Tucson, so summer lasts quite a long time here.

All reservations made for the remaining special event dinners are through Primavera NOT the restaurants. For reservations call David at 520-308-3104. Unless otherwise specified, all dinners begin with a check-in between 6-6:30 with seating at 6:30PM.

Acacia, also in the Catalina Foothills not far from Taolino at 3001 E. Skyline Drive, boasts a Sunset menu until August 31st at $30 per person between 4 and 6PM. Dinners feature the usual assortment of American favorites, chicken, pork, duckling, steak but all with special chef touches that make them unique to this fine restaurant.Also on the menu is a surprising main dish, roasted garlic custard that would certainly satisfy a vegetarian.

Feast, is an appropriately named and creative restaurant at 3719 E Speedway Blvd. It describes itself as a “Relaxed bistro for market-driven, eclectic cuisine that changes monthly, plus a lengthy wine list”. One of their interesting appetizers for August is  “Pickled Shrimp and Fried Smelts, served over white beans and Spanish chorizo with lettuce juice and kale.” Yum!

And last on this small specialized list, Downtown Kitchen & Cocktails, at 135 S 6th Ave, is handily named for its location in the middle of the downtown area. Locally renowned chef, Janos Wilder, is the creative mind and body behind this popular restaurant A busy spot featuring global fare and creative cocktails, Janos was one of the first chefs to take a chance on revitalizing the now bustling downtown restaurant scene.So far so good!

These are just a few of the many wonderful Tucson restaurants. Others have taken root in the past few years and now this city can be proud of its collection of chefs dedicated to making this a great place to eat out..

 

 

FOOD

April 22nd, 2015 by samhughesinn

Barbecue grillThe University of Arizona School of Anthropology celebrates 100 years since its inception with a series of free food lectures. Sponsored in part by the Marshall Foundation, this series explores the area of food & nutrition and its relationship to man and to our perception of ourselves, as it began thousands of years ago.

Up in Smoke: The History of Barbecue will be presented on Thursday, April 23, 2015, 7:00 – 8:30pm, in Social Sciences 100. This free lecture will be hosted by Steven Raichlen in a keynote address at the University of Arizona Social Science Auditorium. (See university map for locations). Steven Raichlen is an award winning author, journalist, lecturer, TV host & novelist. He has a best selling book and TV shows, Primal Grill & Barbecue University on PBS and he has lectured on the history of barbecue at the Smithsonian, the Library of Congress & Harvard University. So, whatever you think you know about throwing a steak of the grill will pale next to this expert’s bank of cooking knowledge

The Human Appetite: A Symposium on Food and Anthropology will be presented Friday, April 24, 1 – 4pm in Haury 216 (see U of A map). Food is the story of human life and this lecture will explore how we think about food from subsistence strategies to nutrition to the role of food in our daily lives.A panel of graduate students in the School of Anthropology will discuss aspects of “how we are what we eat”. Presentations will include the Heritage of Butchery, Early Roman Animal Sacrifice & Consumption, East African diet and identity, Food Security, White Mountain Apache Food Sovereignty and the Biography of Grain.

10,000 Years of Eating in the Southwest, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 10am – 3pm, Arizona State museum lawn. (See U of A map).This lecture covers the changes in food and eating in the Southwest over the past 10,000 years with demonstration booths staffed by students & faculty of the School of Anthropology.

Food Tour: Local Foods from Tucson’s Past, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 11am – 3pm, departs from Arizona State Museum lawn. Cost $25 per person. Sign up at https://uafoundation.org/NetCommunity/localfoods before 9:00 pm, Thursday, April 23. The tour will visit three locations representing Tucson farmers & their local crops at different points during the past 4,000 years. One is a village site on Tumamoc Hill where Native American farmers raised corn about 400 B.C. Below it are the remains of fields where farmers planted agave & pits where they roasted their harvest in A.D.1250.

You can reach these lectures in about a 20 minute walk from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast or park in any of the university garages listed on the map.

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