Tucson’s Winterhaven Festival of Lights

Tucson’s Winterhaven Festival of Lights 

Christmas Lights

Light Festival

Tucson’s Winterhaven Festival of Lights, one of the brightest “no pun intended” events of the holiday season, has been a Tucson tradition for 67 years. A small Tucson community in the middle of town has sponsored this must-see event in which the many hundreds of residents of Winterhaven, both religious and nonsectarian, spend months decorating their homes and properties with an array of colorful lights. Some of them are simple lights in trees or around doors but most of them are intricately designed to tell a story. Some are wildly animated with moving Santa Claus figures flying across roofs in a sleigh with reindeer and Rudolph in the lead. Others are more devotional showing the religious significance of Christmas. But even non-Christian families join the decorating bonanza with illuminated Stars of David or Menorahs. Hanukkah begins on December 24 this year so the two holidays intersect.

Tucson’s Winterhaven Festival of Lights begins this year on December 10 and ends the day after Christmas. It is a not to be missed holiday tradition which many Tucson residents, as well as tourists visit and re-visit year after year. Traffic is intense. Walk-through days, complete with horse-drawn hay wagons, are interspersed with drive-through days and, no surprise, parking can be difficult. The police work extra hours to keep things moving and everyone in good spirits.Those of us in the know, often wait until the day following the day after Christmas to drive through. Officially the festival will be over but the community, having spent countless hours & sometimes months, is reluctant to turn the lights off so you can still get a pretty good idea of how wonderful it is without a crowd.

800px-glowing_christmas_tree_lights_in_the_winter_night

However, this “is” a fund-raising event and although it’s free, a donation of money or food is turned over to the community food bank. So if you go, be a good sport and bring a can of something to donate, or a little cash, whichever you prefer. Last year festival attendees donated almost $24,000 and more than 42,000 pounds of food.That’s a lot of Christmas spirit. The most needed items are Cereal, canned soup, canned meat, canned tomato products, canned vegetables, canned fruit and cold cash.

This year could be the festival’s last. It costs a great deal of money to put this event on, even though the homeowners do all the decorating. Organizing, traffic control, police protection and insurance against accidents all have to be taken care of. The traditional sponsor for this event is bowing out of the deal this year so they are looking for a new source of funding. Donate here to Winterhaven Festival of Lights. Help to find a new sponsor.65th_annual_winterhaven_festival_of_lights_2

Tucson November

Super Moon Over Tucson

Super Moon Over Tucson

Super Moon over Tucsson
November 14, 2016

Thanks to Ken Goldhoff, CFP UBS

Sr. VP, Sr Porfolio Manager
Ken.goldhoff@ubs.com
513-792-2433

We’ll have to wait until 2038 to see another one of these big beauties.

 

 

 

Additional moon shots from other Tucson residents.

Super Moon

Super Moon 2

Super Moon

Super Moon Himmel Park

Summer in Tucson

Monsoon Season

Storm Clouds

Storm clouds forming

People living in colder parts of the country are always anxious to hear horror stories about summer in Tucson but the subject of Monsoon Season only comes up when it’s so hot here no one is very eager to come experience it with us.  Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast has now endured 16 monsoon seasons and is half way through the 17th. We love monsoon.

In our first year of bed & breakfast business Tucson experienced the earliest arrival of monsoon season in history, June 17. Until a few years ago, the arrival of monsoon was calculated on the dew point reaching 55 degrees or more for three consecutive days. The rain almost always began after that third day. Now monsoon season has been designated June 15 until September 30, whether it’s dry or wet, and a more average first rainfall occurs around the first week of July.

Some visitors think we exaggerate the intensity of monsoon storms because they experience heavy rains throughout the year in their own home states. But monsoon can be either hours of gentle rainfall or it can produce violent winds that uproot trees and down power lines. Thousands of lightning strikes can cause fires to flare up in multiple locations and create hazardous conditions for people on the ground. Flooding fills our usually empty river beds to overflowing, and even some unlucky houses in low lying areas. On the campus of the University of Arizona you’ll find metal barricades across the step-down areas of some buildings to help keep the water from rushing under the doors.. People who live here love the frequent showers especially since they often cause the temperature to drop 25 or 30 degrees in minutes. Then our famous “dry heat” is replaced by the not so welcome “humidity”.

Downpour

First monsoon rain 2016.

Tucson receives half of its yearly rainfall during monsoon season; at least that’s the hoped for outcome, and so far 2016 appears to be on track. Storm clouds build up in enormous and beautiful designs and can appear any time of the day. A perfect blue sky can suddenly turn dark as night and claps of thunder can build slowly to ear shattering intensity in minutes. It is dangerous and exciting at the same time bringing a welcome change from the 100 degree days of June, at least for short periods of time..

Lightning

Lightning strikes

A recurring feature of monsoon season is Arizona’s “Stupid Motorist Law“. If a driver goes around a barricade on a flooded street and becomes stranded, he/she can be charged for being rescued. And yet a number of drivers attempt this maneuver every year and in some cases with disastrous results when the car is swept away..

Monsoon season is full of drama, from the first Cumulonimbus clouds poking up over the mountain tops, & the heavy rainfalls, to some of the most beautiful sunsets on earth.

Monsoon sunset

Sunset monsoon season

 

 

Easy Breakfast Recipes

Easy breakfast recipes, especially the kind that are popular with bed and breakfast inns are particularly appealing. Perhaps because most people don’t like to go to a lot trouble for this first meal of the day.. However, most can be used as brunch entrées and some even for dinner. Following is one entire brunch meal idea.

Coffee Cake

Blueberry coffee cake

Blueberry Coffee Cake

1+1/2 cups all purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
2+1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup canola oil                                       3/4 cup milk
1 egg
1+1/2 cups blueberries
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1/3 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 stick butter (firm)

In medium mixing bowl, blend first 7 ingredients and beat thoroughly. Add 1 cup blueberries stirring gently. Spread in greased round 9 inch pan, or 8 inch square pan.

Combine 1/3 cup flour, brown sugar, cinnamon & butter. Sprinkle over batter & and top with remaining 1/2 cup berries. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes until done.

Once your ingredients are assembled, this recipe is an easy breakfast recipe addition, delicious and quick to duplicate.

_________________________________________________________________________________broccoli

Broccoli Casserole

2 10-oz pkgs. frozen broccoli (thawed & cut bite sized
2 T onion minced
5 T butter (divided)
3 T all-purpose flour
1+1/2 cups milk
2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
3 hard boiled eggs, chopped
1/2 cup Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup corn flakes,

Sauté onion in 3 TBS butter until tender; stir in flour. Add milk, salt & pepper; bring to a boil stirring often. Remove from heat and set aside. Place broccoli pieces in a greased 13″ by 9″ baking pan and sprinkle with chopped eggs. Pour milk mixture over the top. Melt remaining butter and combine with cheese and cereal. Crumble over broccoli mixture and bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes. Serves 8

It takes only a few minutes to assemble this easy breakfast recipe -casserole, especially if you use already hard cooked eggs to cut down preparation time.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Side Dish

Potato Cakes

Side Dish Potato Cakes

2 potatoes grated
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt

Combine potatoes with eggs and set aside. Mix flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt together. Add potato mixture, mixing well. Drop by tablespoonful on a hot skillet and spread them with the back of a wooden spoon. Heat until set firm and then flip and cook until golden brown on both sides. Serves 2 – 4 people.

You can buy potatoes already grated to create this easy breakfast recipe.

Fox Theater Tucson

The Fox Theater Tucson – Film, Music, Special Events
1929 Theater

Fox Theater Tucson

The Fox Theater Tucson began construction in summer of 1929, designed by the architect M. Eugene Durfee to feature movies and the then still popular, vaudeville. It opened in April of 1930 with the film, “Chasing Rainbows”, starring Jack Benny in one of his few and unmemorable movie credits. The gorgeous insides are a blend of southwestern desert and Art Deco with touches of Egyptian, Native American and Mayan inspired designs.

For the first scheduled event, the streets were closed to traffic and waxed for dancing. More than 3,000 people bought tickets for the show and the event became a local “must-see” featuring live bands outside and free trolley rides downtown. (Tucson’s original trolley was still operating then and has since been replaced by a shiny new streetcar version in the past few years.) The Fox Theater Tucson flourished for forty years and then, with the advent of more outlying theaters, drive-in movies, television and the loss of retail space, people found other forms of entertainment and popularity declined. The Fox Theater Tucson closed in 1974 and sat vacant for 26 years. The owners had various plans in mind for the building, including destruction, but never got around to any of them.

In the year 2000 the Fox Theater was purchased by a not for profit organization and $13 million dollars were spent for restoration. Its interior was as faithfully reproduced and restored to be as much like the original as possible. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2003 and reopened for business on New Year’s Eve, 12/31/2007. About 1,100 of 1,200 available tickets were sold in the opening fund-raising event in which tickets cost $250 per seat and $1,000 per couple for the balcony “love seats.” The restoration of this theater, along with many restaurants and new living spaces, has contributed to the overall vitality of a revived downtown.

Oldies-but-goodies movies and film festivals are scheduled throughout much of the year currently but along with these are many live presentations featuring, singers, musicians, combos and many other special events. Check the schedule, seating chart & ticket sales for entertainment the rest of this summer and coming up for fall and winter. See featured videos on YouTube. Fox Theater Tucson, 17 W. Congress Street.

Fox Theatre Tucson

Fox Theatre

 

UA PRESENTS

UA Presents and collaboration with Broadway in Tucson features a  group of amaazing theater productions and special guest appearances, most of which are held at Centennial Hall, located on the campus of the University of Arizona.

Theatre

Centennial Hall

Centennial Hall first opened in 1937 as an auditorium and lecture hall and ten years later began hosting the Tucson Sunday Evening Forum featuring well known  American figures including Walter Cronkite, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Eleanor Roosevelt, among others. The hall was renovated in 1985 and named in honor of the university’s 100th anniversary and then became the venue for UA Presents. In 2010 the first of the Broadway in Tucson series, Wicked, was held here and the partnership between the two organizations began.

UA Presents features can be found at http://uapresents.org/upcoming-events. Enter the month/year and search categories that include Classical, Spotlight, Dance, Jazz & Blues, Global Sounds, and Broadway & Family. Look forward to famous guest singers, musicians, classical ensembles, and many talented artists in other artistic pursuits. For instance, Chaka Khan & Bernadette Peters, Itzhak Perlman,  the Peking Acrobats, Dance Theatre of Harlem, a night with Ben Vereen and many other memorable events are on the Fall/Winter, 2016/2017 calendar. .

Broadway in Tucson, in collaboration with UA Presents will showcase 7 musical productions beginning in September 2016 and ending in April, 2017. Most are familiar names to Tucson  but a few are here for the first time. The list includes Cabaret in September, Mama Mia (October), Sound of Music (November), Dirty Dancing (January), Motown, the Musical (February), Kinky Boots (March) and The Bodyguard (April). Check out the dates and story lines at http://broadwayintucson.com/shows.htm and buy tickets online at http://uapresents.org/genre-broadway. Centennial Hall is easy walking distance from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast.

Season ticket holders save up to 40% off regular ticket prices, get priority seating and can exchange their tickets in the event of a conflict. Click here for info or call the Season Ticket Office at 1-866-821-2929 (M-F)!

Some events are held at Stevie Eller Dance Theatre & Crowder Hall on campus, or at the Fox Theatre in downtown Tucson.

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Sam Hughes Neighborhood

Courtesy of Carolyn Classen and the Sam Hughes Neighborhood list serv, the following events are coming up the weekend of April 8-10, 2016:

Spring Fling on the University of Arizona East Mall

April 8, 9 and 10, 2016

Spring Fling is the largest student-run carnival in the nation. Each year, over 1,500 University of Arizona students volunteer to bring fun and excitement to the Tucson community. The mission of ASUA Spring Fling is to provide funding for UA clubs and organizations through this 3 day event.
Including over 35 rides, games, and 20 original food booths! Check out all the events for the family at http://springfling.asua.arizona.edu/. Phone info at 520-621-5610

Sam Hughes Neighborhood Garden Tour

April 10, 10 to 4 p.m. Tickets $10, SHNA members $5 (bring your certificate of membership), children free with paid adult.  Tickets on sale at Sam Hughes Elem. School, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. More info: www.samhughes.org.garden tour

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Cyclovia Tucson – 10-3pm

Get out of your car and walk or ride your bike through car free roads.

cyclovia_logo

cyclovia2016-600x600

Sunday, Apr. 10, 2016
10am – 3pm

The route: Lost Barrio Historic Warehouse Shopping District (Park Avenue south of Broadway) to Himmel Park  (1000 N. Tucson Blvd.)

Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016
10am – 3pm

Himmel Park, 10 to 3 p.m. (Car free route from Himmel Park, south on Tucson Blvd., west on E. 3rd St. bike route, south on N. Olsen Ave., west on E. 9th St., then over to Rincon Hts. neighborhood, and the Lost Barrio).  Sam Hughes garden tour is on the Cyclovia map as the Sam Hughes Activity Hub. Map attached.  www.cycloviatucson.org.

 Earth Day

Earth Day Tucson at Himmel Park,  10 to 3 p.m. (along Tucson Blvd.), www.tucsonearthday.org. The 22nd annual event celebrating the community and the environment, in conjunction with Cyclovia Tucson. Print brochure for Tucson Earth Day. Event will include  eco-themed displays, information and hands-on activities for all ages. Topics include: • Air quality • Climate change + Sustainability • Water harvesting and conservation • Renewable energy • Wildlife protection • Land conservation + Native plants • Reduce, reuse and recycling • Alternate modes of transportation •

“Cycling with Cyclovia – Partnering with Cyclovia Tucson for continued success”environmental themes”. Free admission

 

LOCATION, LOCATION

Location, Location

Texas home

Finding a great place to live is all about location, location. Once you’ve chosen a state, a destination, either long term or just for a certain season, then the next step is to choose someone in Real Estate whom you can trust to find just exactly what you have in mind.

Two fabulous locations are Tucson, AZ and Grapevine, TX. The latter town is the location of Dallas/Ft. Worth Airport but Grapevine is not Dallas. It’s much smaller and more livable than the big city and has the advantage, like Tucson, of being only a few minutes’ drive from the airport.

In 1843 General Sam Houston attempted to forge a treaty at Grape Vine Springs, and  invited American Indian tribes to sign a peace treaty; and although the Indians arrived several weeks late, the Treaty of Birds Fort was signed opening North Texas for settlement. By November of 1845 settlers had arrived in the area now known as Grapevine. True to its name, Grapevine is a grape growing region and proudly serves Texas varieties at the wine bars located in downtown. This is also a great shopping area for locals and tourists with many smart little shops along its main street. The town as it is today is reminiscent of early 19th century American towns and Grapevine has actively worked to enhance its downtown business area.

Downtown Grapevine, TX

Downtown Grapevine, TX

During the Christmas season it is so beautiful you almost believe in Santa Claus again.
Grapvine paradeChristmas Tree GrapevineCottage Grapevine

Of course dozens of towns make up the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and a trusted real estate agent in the area, who also calls Grapevine home, is Keely Brown. Keely is associated with Keller-Williams Realty in Southlake, TX. Office:817-865-8771 Cell:847-722-1928 so if you are planning a relocation to that area, give her a call. She can also direct you to a Keller Williams agent in Tucson if you would like to find a place here.kwbusinesscard Dallas/Ft. Worth and Tucson International Airport have daily flights back and forth and Dallas is one of the places that visitors to Tucson often land in first since direct flights from Tucson to other parts of the country are not as frequently available.

And if you’re looking for real estate in Tucson, be sure to make Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast your place to stay while you look for more permanent housing.

Bed and Breakfasts or AirBnB

A Tale of Lodging Choices

In this decade business & vacation travelers have had more options to the traditional hotel room than ever before in history because of the popularity of established Bed and Breakfasts, or AirBnB lookalikes. But what are the differences and why choose one over the other? Most people decide on a destination by the photos and the price range. Everyone wants the best deal for the money as well as a great experience and there is no denying the fact that AirBnB gives the world traveler a huge selection of seemingly attractive options. But how to know if the choice should be Bed and Breakfasts or AirBnB?

Air Logo
AirBnB is not a bed and breakfast website despite the name. It could just as easily have been called “Book an Unknown Vacation Rental With A Complete Stranger”.  It is an advertising vehicle which will list any rental posted by any person without prior knowledge of the owner or the accommodation. The advertiser can make any claim he cares to make about the rental and both the host and the exact location of the property remain anonymous until a reservation is made and paid for. AirBnB handles the transaction and what happens after that is in the hands of both host and guest.

But buyer beware! You will rarely find legal, licensed, monitored or approved rentals there. You are playing a game of chance with the internet version of the classified ads in newspapers or magazines. It’s a fancier version of Craig’s list, boasting a beautifully conceived website and promising results that are sheer guesswork at best.The paying guest doesn’t know until he arrives if the neighborhood is dangerous, the facility less than represented in a photo, or even if the host is sane and legally permitted to rent space in the building.

In 6 years AirBnB has grown wildly popular resulting in unbelievable wealth for the company and usually good results for the guest. But it is an imperfect system judged to be unfair in a market place where hotels, resorts, spas and bed and breakfasts have had to invest a great deal of time effort, and money in order to offer something that the so called “sharing economy” cannot – TRUST, SAFETY & DEPENDABILITY.

Check on the following internet sites for uncensored reviews from hosts, guests and in print media for AirBnB rentals: Huffington Post November 23, 2015 – TrustPilot – AirBnBHell – Distractify – The Smoking Gun, as well as others, and then decide if this is a good choice for you. 

B&B sign France

B&B sign France

If you decide instead to stay in an established bed and breakfast just Google “bed and breakfasts” in the city or area of your choice and visit their individual websites for photos, history, area attractions rates and amenities.

In a B&B, each property, each bedroom is unique, original, with its own sense of style and space unlike cookie cutter hotel rooms.The owner or (on occasion) hired innkeeper is generally available 24 hours a day, to see to guests’ needs. And best of all since this person is in house, the visitor has a local expert who has already been to the tourist attractions in the city, has eaten at most of the recommended restaurants, knows the best places to shop, where to buy gas, and has an extensive list of print material, guides and maps available. Generally breakfasts are also unique and attention is paid to restricted diets, allergies, or items a guest just might not enjoy.

Another B&B
BB breakfast

BB bedroom

The B&B owner has been through the hoops with his local city code office, He is licensed, inspected and required to conform to certain basic standards in order to provide lodging. He is subject to spot checks by the Health Department on a regular basis and is required to have a permit renewed each year along with the license to do business. He may belong to local Visitors’ Associations, other B&B organizations and websites. The building must conform to certain standards as to fire protection, windows & door exits, bathroom facilities & number of guests permitted. Parking permits may be required if on-site parking is not available and he must pay local and/or state taxes, file annual reports and carry a hefty insurance load to protect his property and its guests. He has an established business in a community and neighborhood that knows him. He must sometimes spend a great deal of money on advertising in print media and online in order to protect his reputation in this pursuit, which to him, is a way of life plus a source of pride.BB example 1

So before you, as a visitor, a traveler, put your money down on an unknown, evaluate the risk involved in making your travel plans. Are you willing to bet on the long shot, to take a chance just to save a little cash, or to aim for a sure thing? Think about it.

 

The Innkeeper’s Dog

Epitaph for a  Much Loved Animal

Lucy

Lucy

Lucy, the innkeeper’s dog died on Tuesday, September 29, 2015. She was not quite nine years old. Her passing was not so much a surprise as an event long avoided by her sheer determination to live, and mine to keep her well and happy. Animals are wonderful and I’ve had many dogs since childhood, but there was something about this one, something that struck almost everyone who visited Sam Hughes Inn and stopped to say hello to Lucy. She had eyes that begged for sympathy, love and attention. Guests often threatened to take her home and some would even disappear for a nap, taking Lucy along with them.

She was always a joy to have around, full of life and happy to be loved. I figured she’d go home with anyone who picked her up, so happy was she to be stroked and talked to. Coming home, even from a short errand was cause for exultant leaping, crying, and begging to be picked up, as if I’d been gone for years when it was just to the grocery store,

She was a dog for humans only and couldn’t have any animal friends of her own for fear she would catch something.  Because of her ailments she only received rabies inoculations; the others were feared because they might do more harm than good.. Many years ago she developed an auto immune disorder that destroyed the joints in her front legs and the medications took her immune system along for the ride.

Home with new legsFor more than a year we marched back to the orthopedic surgeon’s office to have casts removed and fresh ones put on her legs. The staff always decorated them in flowers or pumpkins, Christmas trees, and other fun seasonal items or signs like Stop and Go. The casts might be hot pink, orange or bright red and they didn’t slow her down at all. She could run, and chase lizards & birds with the best of them and quickly accustomed herself to the awkwardness of stiff legs. More than six years ago her permanent leg braces took the place of the colorful casts and these too were just a bump in the road for her.

Lucy had to visit the Vet many times a month because of the constant infections that attacked her. In March this year she developed diabetes and for many months we struggled with getting the dosage of insulin just right. So along with daily home tests she went once a week to check her blood glucose levels. She had to eat three times a day to keep her flagging weight up and to administer almost a dozen different medications daily, most of them hidden in treats or sprinkled on her food. You could say she was a triumph of big Pharmaceuticals, but I know it was really love that kept her moving.

Although in the last year she wasn’t able to do much besides eat, sleep and stroll around the house and back yard, she still exhibited the desire to play. She loved to stretch out in the sun and to wander around the yard looking for lizards.She growled to show her appreciation of belly rubs, unless they just put her to sleep.

On the morning of September 26 she began to show signs of an illness which turned into pneumonia. Her blood pressure sky rocketed, she grew anemic, had a heart murmur and was unable to eat anything. Despite valiant last minute attempts to clear her lungs we had to give in to the inevitable.

She died surrounded by people who loved her, the wonderful Vets, Drs.Tim Ireland & Amy Kranch at Encanto Pet Clinic, Tina Ireland, Liz, the techs & assistants who helped and worried over her, the woman who created her fabulous leg braces and made many home visits to ensure that they were in proper working order (Kate Titus of A Loyal Companion), and her fantastic groomer at Encanto, best friend to all creatures with four legs and tails – even feathers, Treva. We were so lucky to have all these people who worked so hard to keep her alive and well. I know they miss Lucy too.. And I will certainly miss all of them.

RIP, my dear little buddy.

RIP, my dear little buddy.

.The following pictures are of Lucy and some of the friends she made along the way.
Wendy 210 dogLori & Ray A.5 dogArleneGEDC0007Chauncey & David 112 dog

13 dog Lucy Friends 3-6Lucy Friends 3-4
Antonio

Science Café

Earth

Earth

The University of Arizona (UA Science) presents Science Café, a free series of informal science lectures given by University of Arizona scientists & researchers from several different fields. Unlike most university lectures, these are not only informal but fun and take place in several very laid back venues.Although questions and answers are part of the experience you won’t be expected to pass a test.

A few of these lectures have come and gone but there are still many interesting topics on the schedule through December, 2015. Come as you are and learn something new. All the lectures will be held at 6:00 p.m. at the various locations:

                →                  →                   →                   →                 → 

soil waterThe Downtown  Series is being held on Tuesdays at Magpie’s Pizza, 605 N. 4th Avenue and includes discussion of air, food, water & soil..

The Many Paths of Water in the Critical Zone
with Tom Meixner, October 20.

Right Beneath Our Feet: Discover the Wonders of Soil
with Craig Rasmussen, November 17.

The Little Things that Rule the World: Microscopic Life in Soil
with Rachel Gallery, December 8th.

                  →                  →                   →                   →                 → 

Another series is being held at Borderlands Brewing Co. at 119 E. Toole on Thursdays with the theme “Mathematics of Health & Disease”.Bone Scan

Blood and Numbers: Impact of Oxygen Transport in Healthy and Diseased Tissue, with Tim Secomb, October 8.

→ Inward Gaze: CAT Scans, MRIs and New Body Scanning Technologies,
with Leonid Kunyansky, November 12.

→ Conquering Cancer: Use of Modern Statistics to Improve Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention, with Helen (Hao) Zhang on December 10.

                →                  →                   →                   →                 → 

Tumamox Hill Lab

Desert Lab Tumamoc Hill

 

The Tumamoc Hill Lecture Series is on Tuesdays. A shuttle will be provided to take guests to the library of the old Desert Laboratory Please make reservation so that space will be made available. Contact cynthiaanson@email.arizona.edu or call 520–629-9455.

Legumes

Legumes

→ Banking on Legumes: An Adaptive Strategy for the Future, with Matt Johnson , October 13.

→ Lizards and Climate Change in the Sonoran Desert, with Aaron D. Flesch & Philip Rosen, Novermber 10.

Gila Monster

Gila Monster

Gecko

Gecko

 

 

 

 

 

The Science Cafe Series continues in the Fall at SaddleBrooke in the Desert View Performing Arts Center on Thursdays, 6:30 p.m., November 19 and December 17, 2015. For more information on this location and other information see the web site at UASCIENCE and click on Community Connections.. More lectures are planned for the Spring.

 

 

More Great Tucson Restaurants

A month ago we described a group of “original” to Tucson eateries and now would like to note that there are many more great Tucson Restaurants close by. In most cases, these are one of a kind eating experiences to suit the most devoted foodie. Some of our favorites include the following, ethnic spots to enjoy fabulously different food experiences from other countries.

Mexican

Mexican Cuisine

Café Poca Cosa (Unique Mexican), is always the first answer to the question “Are there any good Mexican restaurants?” It seems absurd in a town like this so close to the border. There are, of course, many, many good Mexican restaurants but only one is Café Poca Cosa. Unlike many other restaurants the owner/chef, Suzana Davila, is generally present in the dining room making sure everything is perfect. She is a master of molé and changes the menu twice a day based on market purchases.The menu is presented on chalkboard and requires at least the basic knowledge of chicken, fish and beef in Español (or the helpful staff will translate). A unique dining experience featuring regional flavors culled from Suzana’s Guaymas, Sonora home. This is my personal favorite Tucson restaurant at 110 Pennington Street in the middle of downtown Tucson. Reservations are recommended; the place is incredibly popular. Call 520-622-6400. Open until 10 p.m. Friday & Saturday; until 9 p.m. other nights, and closed Sunday & Monday.

Zemams (Ethiopian) is now two times as good. The original location at 2731 E. Broadway (520-323-9928) has expanded to Zeman’s Too at 119 E. Speedway (520-882-4955).Though they have no

Ethiopean

Ethiopian Cuisine

liquor license you are encouraged to bring your own for a $1.50 corking fee. Featuring Ethiopian specialty dishes both meat and veggie served on a delicious giant circle of native Ingera bread torn into bite size pieces and eaten with “your hands”, the way you remember it from childhood. Zemams also offers a gluten free version of the bread if you order it before your arrival to avoid waiting. Surroundings are unpretentious and the food is just wonderful. Open 11 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and closed Monday.Many restaurants are closed on Sunday so this is a nice alternative to the Sunday blahs.

 

Greek

Greek Cuisine

Athens on 4th Avenue (Greek) is at 500 N. 4th Avenue & 6th Street. The food is authentic Greek, featuring fresh fish & seafood, meat dishes & vegetarian specialties plus homemade soups and desserts, all at a moderate price. As you will see on their website, chef Andreas Delfakis opened his restaurant in Tucson in 1993 and has been honored with Best Greek Restaurant mentions in many publications over the years. Athens has a faithful following and is open Monday – Saturday from 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. Call 520-624-6886. If you like Greek food you will love this place on the very touristy 4th Avenue shopping street. Opah!

Bangkok Cafe (Thai) is located at 2511 E Speedway Blvd. (520-323-6555) just across the street from the Sam Hughes Historic District.Open Monday through Thursday until 9 p.m. and Friday/Saturday until 9:30 p.m., closed on Sunday. Serving authentic Thai dishes featuring beef, pork, chicken, shrimp and squid with noodles in varying degrees of spiciness from mild to intense, according to the diner’s wishes and including exotic spices and sauces. Many curry dishes are also

Thai

Thai Cuisine

on the menu. Jasmine or Green Tea, tropical juices and even an Arnold Palmer (50/50 tea & lemonade) are some of the beverages. There is no bar service.Homemade ice creams for dessert.

More favorite restaurants will be featured in months to come. In the meantime, try one of these great places in central and downtown Tucson, AZ.

 

Tucson Festival of Films

Tucson Festival of TilmA new player in the crowded field of local film festivals will be the Tucson Festival of Films, (sponsored by Cox Communications) to be held in the Temple of Music & Art,the grandly

Arizona Theater Company

Temple of Music & Art

named 1920‘s era performing arts theater which also houses the Arizona Theater Company at 330 S. Scott Avenue. From October 8 – 10, films chosen from eight of the longest-running Tucson film festivals will be shown.

A selection of film shorts, plus musical & filmmaker guests will also be announced soon. But for now the lineup of films include the following (according to the Arizona Daily Star):

Sounds of Tucson, Presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Tucson Film & Music Festival, this is a 63 minute documentary describing the “mix of South American music & American Rock” which has been attracting musicians to Tucson for many years.

Güeros, (presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Tucson Cine México) is a comedy which won five Ariel awards in Mexico plus Best First Feature at the Berlin Film Festival. The is described as a “cool, retro, black and white portrait of Mexico City” and of three young men trying to find their purpose and futures in a city of many millions of people.

The 40th anniversary screening of Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore will be presented by Tucson Festival of Films & Loft Film Fest. It was filmed here in Tucson and southern Arizona so long time residents will recognize the shopping center, Monterey Village, the Chicago Music Store and the now closed Longhorn Bar & Grill in Amado.This 1974 hit movie stars some still familiar faces – Ellen Burstyn, Kris Kristofferson, Harvey Keitel, Diane Ladd & Jodie Foster.

Death In The Desert, presented by Tucson Festival and Arizona underground Film Festival, is based on the life story of Ted Binion, the heir to the Binion’s Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, the original home of the World Series of Poker.His colorful career included drugs & connections to the mob and ultimately ended tragically.

Landmine Goes Click is presented in cooperation with The Tucson Terrorfest. Described as the Arizona premiere of a film about 3 American tourists backpacking through European Georgia. Time to bring out the garlic and a big cross I think.

Maína, from the Festival of Film along with Native Eyes Film Showcase, has won 3 American Indian Film Festival awards and concerns two early civilizations in America.

Dropkick by Tucson Festival and Arizona international Film Festival, is a comedy about a group of women rugby players and was shown in Tucson at the last Arizona International Film Festival. It features local actors and locations.

Tucson is a film friendly town all year and not just in the summer when the AC is turned on high. Watch the website for times and dates of each of these unusual film offerings in October.

Important Birthdays August 20

Tucson celebrates two important birthdays on August 20 each year.

Tucson began with the fort Tucson Presidio San Agustin, founded on that date in 1775 and it stood through the 1880’s. Only a portion of the wall remains today on the original site as the city has grown up around it. A territorial museum with courtyard and exhibits from early Tucson history has been created on the spot at the corner of Washington & Court Street. It comes to life during Living History Days (the second Saturday of the month, October through April) with performers in period dress going about the duties of early daily life, baking bread, blacksmithing, etc. There is a self-guided tour of the museum including a munitions room, tower, commissary & living space for the soldiers who lived here then. An open Hohokam pit house is also featured. Winter hours are 10AM-4PM and an hour less in the summer.

1775 Birthday Tucson

Presidio San Agustin

A 240th birthday celebration is held annually with birthday cake, cannon fire & living history demonstrations along with local groups and dignitaries making an appearance. Check the website for information about upcoming events and exhibits.

 

Reid Park Baby Elephant

Nandi’s First Birthday

And the second important birthday this August 20 is the very first one for the Reid Park Zoo’s famous baby elephant, Nandi.  A special birthday breakfast will be held for her at 7AM, and tickets sold out very quikly. Another event will be held on August 22 where the public can watch Nandi receive birthday treats and sing Happy Birthday along with the staff. Nandi  is a big baby now, weighing more than 900 pounds, but somehow she still appears tiny next to her much larger brother and parents. If you missed her birthday she’ll still be available during regular zoo hours, usually 9AM to 4PM. Don’t miss a visit to this special baby.

Restaurants Found Only in Tucson

Chain restaurants can be found in abundance in every city of a certain size but locally we are lucky to have a group of sophisticated restaurants found only in Tucson. Those featured here are, for the most part, elegant & unique restaurants where visitors will find original cuisine highlighting local food sources. Some belong to a group called Tucson Originals and some to another group called eatlocaltucson,

The underlying appeal of these restaurants is that they are locally owned and dedicated to, as much as possible, using food products locally grown and/or produced.

In a class all by itself, is the Arizona Inn at 2200 E. Elm St., a family owned and run luxury hotel/resort on any tourist’s “must see” list since the early 1930’s. Boasting all the amenities of a 5 Star Hotel/Resort, it has two dining rooms, Main Dining (inside and with a stricter dress code than most Tucson restaurants) and the Audubon Bar, which is casual and opens to the beautiful lawns and gardens on its patio facing side. Arizona inn menus offer a variety of taste treats from the small and reasonably priced items, to full dinners when price is not an object for the very special occasion. A brunch menu is offered on Saturday and Sunday. The inn is located just 1.6 miles directly north of Sam Hughes Inn, presenting a nice way to walk off a full meal if you’re staying here and eating there.

Special Event

Primavera Cooks 2015

Pastiche Modern Eatery, (also not far from Sam Hughes Inn), at 3025 North Campbell, has been part of the Tucson scene for many years and almost never disappoints with its variety of popular offerings that appeal to anyone who loves to eat out.

On September 9, 2015 Pastiche will be one of six “Restaurants found only in Tucson” participating in a yearly dinner event called Primavera Cooks,, Described as “possibly the most fun you will ever have at a nonprofit fundraising dinner” the meal will consist of a 4 or 5 course, wine paired fabulous evening out. Three of the restaurants have already had their fund raisers earlier in the summer. Sorry to have missed them.

Another restaurant still planning its Primavera dinner on August 30th, is Kingfisher. 2564 E Grant Rd. This perennial winner of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence is also proud of its specialty oyster menu. Plenty of seafood is on offer here (For 8 years Tucson Weekly has voted Kingfisher the Best Seafood Restaurant in town) along with a variety of meat dishes.

If you read this blog in time, Tavolino, an Italian “ristorante”at 2890 E. Skyline Drive will have its specialty dinner on Wednesday, August 19. On the regular menu you’ll find home-made pastas and signature pizzas made in their wood burning oven. Described as elegant but relaxed, Tavolino also has an excellent patio dining area.Late summer hours begin on Memorial Day. (This is Tucson, so summer lasts quite a long time here.

All reservations made for the remaining special event dinners are through Primavera NOT the restaurants. For reservations call David at 520-308-3104. Unless otherwise specified, all dinners begin with a check-in between 6-6:30 with seating at 6:30PM.

Acacia, also in the Catalina Foothills not far from Taolino at 3001 E. Skyline Drive, boasts a Sunset menu until August 31st at $30 per person between 4 and 6PM. Dinners feature the usual assortment of American favorites, chicken, pork, duckling, steak but all with special chef touches that make them unique to this fine restaurant.Also on the menu is a surprising main dish, roasted garlic custard that would certainly satisfy a vegetarian.

Feast, is an appropriately named and creative restaurant at 3719 E Speedway Blvd. It describes itself as a “Relaxed bistro for market-driven, eclectic cuisine that changes monthly, plus a lengthy wine list”. One of their interesting appetizers for August is  “Pickled Shrimp and Fried Smelts, served over white beans and Spanish chorizo with lettuce juice and kale.” Yum!

And last on this small specialized list, Downtown Kitchen & Cocktails, at 135 S 6th Ave, is handily named for its location in the middle of the downtown area. Locally renowned chef, Janos Wilder, is the creative mind and body behind this popular restaurant A busy spot featuring global fare and creative cocktails, Janos was one of the first chefs to take a chance on revitalizing the now bustling downtown restaurant scene.So far so good!

These are just a few of the many wonderful Tucson restaurants. Others have taken root in the past few years and now this city can be proud of its collection of chefs dedicated to making this a great place to eat out..

 

 

Farmers’ Markets in Tucson

farmers market

Farmers Merket

All seasons, but especially in summer, you will find an abundance of farmers’ markets in Tucson.

Some operate in the morning and some in the evening to take advantage of the coolest parts of the day, although, on many days you’d be hard pressed to find the coolest part. Take a spray bottle of water, wear a hat and lots of sun screen and go out and find fabulous locally grown fruits and vegetables,

Chile Ristras

Chile Ristras

desert honey, baked goods and chile ristras (a ristra is an arrangement of drying chili pepper pods used for cooking or as a decorative item).You can find a market any day of the week but here are some of the better known ones.

Tucson Farmers’ Market at Maynards, 400 N. Toole Ave.- Located behind the restaurant, Maynard’s Market & Kitchen at the Old Train Station across the street from the Congress Hotel. Among the veggies & fruits you’ll also find locally made tortillas, tamales, baked goods, cheese, coffee, tea, salsa and many other goodies.Open Saturdays, April through October, 8 a.m. to Noon.

Santa Cruz River Farmers’ Market at Mercado San Agustin – 100 S. Avenida del Convento. This the last stop on the trolley line and boasts a bakery (try their doughnuts), several shops, a commercial kitchen, some yummy Mexican food and a lovely restaurant, Agustin Kitchen. You’ll find a big selection here too, along with honey, nuts, plants & flowers. Open evening hours, 4-7 p.m. Thurdays. Phone 622-0525, ext 7262.

paprika-65270_640

El Pueblo Farmers Market – El Rio Health center parking lot, 101 W Irvington Rd.Their offerings include eggs, herbs, vegetables and honey. Open Mondays, 3-5 p.m., phone 520-882-3313 for information.

Friday Farmers’ Market at Broadway Village – 2836 E.Broadway. featuring all of the above plus seafood (we don’t know where this might come from but it’s different). Open 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

St. Philip’s Plaza Farmers’ Market, 4280 N. Campbell Ave. Voted Best of Tucson, 2014 (Tucson Weekly) and for good reason. It’s one of the biggestmarkets in Southwestern Arizona and supports a

diverse group of local farmers. It’s surrounded by an early Tucson shopping area featuring many fabulous shops in a beautiful setting. This one is about eight minutes north on Campbell from Sam Hughes Inn bed & breakfast. Open Saturdays & Sundays, 8 a.m. – Noon.Farmers' Market logo

Prickly Pear

Prickly Pear Cactus Tuna

June in Tucson

June in Tucson is, perhaps, the cruelest month. That’s especially true this year because last month was wonderfully mild. When 100 degree temperatures return, Tucson’s residents have to become creative and develop tough skins because they know there will be many, many more days like this one. So, resident or visitor, here are some things to do in June that will help build up endurance for the hot days and nights to follow.

Movies Under the Stars

Three locations are offering evening outdoor movies for people who want to enjoy being outside after sunset.

outdoor theater

Demeester Performance Center

Every other Friday Reid Park’s Demeester Performing Arts Pavillion, 900 S. Randolph Way, is hosting free admission movies. Some bench seats are available but most people prefer to bring a blanket or a folding chair & sit on the grassy hillside. June 19th’s show is Shrek, a favorite with families with children .Food trucks are nearby to satisfy hunger & thirst.

La Placita

Every Thursday evening beginning at about 7:30, Cinema La Placita at 100 S. Church Avenue, presents oldie but goodie movies on its patio. Seats are available at tables scattered around the patio and some bench seating, but to be assured a good seat you can always bring your own. A $3 charge includes popcorn. June 4 will have Private Benjamin starring Goldie Hawn, June 11, A Shot in the Dark with the never to be forgotten, Peter Sellers, and on June 19, King Kong (the 1933 version) and June 25th, Dr. Stranglove (Peter Sellers again). Refreshments are also available at the restaurants of La Placita.

And for a real change of pace in outdoor movies, the next Movie Under the Stars event will be 7:30 p.m. June 26 at East Lawn Palms Cemetery, 5801 E. Grant Road. Movies are projected on an inflatable screen. Watch the newspaper, Tucson.com, for the name of the next production. Bring blanket for seating although some chairs will be set up and concessions will be open. Sounds a little creepy but it’s a Tucson Thing now that the drive-ins are all gone. Seating is on grassy lawn not on grave sites.

Art Center Offerings in June

Zac Harmon Guitar

Zac Harmon Guitar

 

The Sea of Glass Center – Center for the Arts, 330 E. 7th Street, an unusual indoor venue, has scheduled three very different events in June. On June 19th, Zac Harmon (called International Blues Ambassador), with his 4 piece band, presents a concert at 7:3PM. A dinner/concert package is available. Tickets available online at the website and read more about Zac’s blues career beginning in Jackson, MS..

 

Documentary with speaker

One Track Heart Promo

Saturday, June 20 at 7:00 PM, the documentary, “One Track Heart:The Story of Krishna Das”  will follow the speaker, Jivananda dasa Vanacarif of ISKCON, describing the basic philosophies of Hinduism. He has traveled the world lecturing and sharing the word of his favorite guru. The documentary describes the evolution of rock musician turned spiritual leader, Jeffrey Kagel,(Krishna Das) who in 1970 turned his back on rock stardom to pursue a personal search for spiritual fulfillment. Check website for tickets and more information on both men.

 

Dalai LamaAnd on Saturday, June 27, Sea of Glass will showcase the film, The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle For Freedom. The Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual leader, has lived in exile for most of his life trying to reach a compromise with China.The struggle continues to this day. Again, information and tickets can be found on the website along with a trailer from the film. Tickets purchased in advance are less expensive than day of the show tickets.

And enjoy lovingly prepared, locally sourced & reasonably priced plant based food items at The Food for Ascension Cafe, located next door, before or after these shows..

 

Music Scene

band

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

 

The historic Fox Theatre announces these special events in June all starting at 7:30 PM: June 6, Nitty, Gritty Dirt Band (country/folk), Thursday, June 11, Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn (Americana), Saturday, June 13, Phil Wickham (Christian), and Friday, June 19, Art Garfunkel (super famous singer/songwriter).

Phil Wickham

Phil Wickham

 

Garfunkel

Art Garfunkel

Duo

Fleck & Washburn

Summer in Tucson

Summer Sun

Summer in Tucson:

Arizona enjoys more than 300 sunny days a year and in the summer months it’s important to find ways to endure and also enjoy, summer in Tucson. A little creativity is necessary and it’s always good to remember that even though it may be beastly hot outside, it will never prevent you from pursuing activities the way winter in colder climes does. You don’t have to shovel it and you don’t have to scrape it off your windshield and if you’re lucky, summer will only last until mid-October. After that, it’s heavenly here. You just have to find places and things to do that keep you out of the blazing sun during the hottest hours of the day.

Until the middle of May the nights and mornings in Tucson are cool and pleasant. As June, the nastiest month, approaches, night and morning begin to come close to daytime heat, minus the sunshine. Air Conditioning is our salvation, in the house, in the car, in stores & theaters; it’s everywhere you want to be. You just have to figure out how to navigate from air conditioned place to air conditioned place and remember to drink lots of water.

One new reason to spend part of summer in Tucson is the Summer in the City Discount Card. About 130 merchants in the five shopping and entertainment districts are offering discounts up to 50 percent with the card.You can order it online for $5 and there is no limit to the number of times you can use it. Stay at Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast and two people can use the inn’s cards to receive discounts on food & drink, to purchase something special, or take a yoga class. The possibilities for savings are at least 130. Cards are valid through the end of August. Check the website for the list of merchants participating.

COOL PURSUITS:

Mt. LemmonMt. Lemmon Sky Center
has the largest public viewing telescope in the Southwest. They offer nightly presentations by gifted astronomers at an always cool altitude. Check the website or phone 520-626-8122, Mt. Lemmon at any time of day will be considerably cooler than Tucson.

DeGrazia Gallery

DeGrazia Gallery

DeGrazia Gallery in the Sun occupies ten acres created and built by late Tucson artist Ted DeGrazia. Multiple cleverly conceived buildings house the huge collection of originals: oils, pastels, metalwork, pottery, ceramics & sculpture all designed by this incredibly talented artist. Some of the interesting creations are outside but you can spend almost all the time indoors in the labyrinth of rooms housing his works. 6300 N. Swan Rd. 520-299-9191.

La Vida Fantastica

Unknown Artist, Kuna Culture

The Tucson Museum of Art at 140 N. Main Ave. in downtown Tucson, is located in the El Presidio Historic Block of early Tucson architecture.. This summer will feature several interesting exhibits. The WPA Connection: Selections from the Modern Art Collection and La Vida Fantastica: Selections from the American Folk Art Collection. Along with its vast permanent collection  you can spend many happy hours in the cool of the museum and grab a bite to eat at their yummy Cafe’ a la C’art. No sweat guaranteed!

Summer 2015 Exhibit

Summer Exhibit Mini Time Museum of Miniatures

The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures offers 10,000 square feet of air conditioned wonder as you peek into the fascinating tiny world of hundreds of different miniature art displays. Antique & contemporary miniatures are sure to please young and old. Closed on Mondays so check the website for hours on the other days. 4455 E. Camp Lowell Dr., 520-881-0606.

Field, Pima Air & Space

Pima Air & Space Museum

Pima Air & Space Museum has five air cooled hangers featuring commercial, military and civil aviation exhibits. You can also enjoy a toasty tram tour of its 80 acres of famous and not so famous aircraft and/or tour the Boneyard with its hundreds of mummy wrapped aircraft lined up by type. These tours are true examples of a Summer in Tucson experience and are not likely to be cool, so bring a spray bottle of water or a hand fan if you decide to indulge. 520-574-0462

Queen Mine

Queen Mine

 

And if you’re spending a few days of Summer in Tucson and want to venture a little further out, visit the cooler old world town of Bisbee (at an altitude of more than 5500 feet), and its Queen Mine,once a busy working copper mine. The mine is an always chilly 47 degrees so you’ll need a jacket. You’ll ride the mine train deep inside the tunnel while wearing miner’s hats, slickers and lanterns. The tour lasts about an hour & fifteen minutes. Call 866-432-2071 for reservations.

 

Cave interior

Cave stalactites, stalagmites

And for another cool subterranean adventure, don’t miss Kartchner Caverns State Park to witness a still forming, water dripping, perfect cave, undisturbed by man until its discovery in 1974 and featuring awesome stalactites and stalagmites. Great care is taken that nothing harms the interior of this cave so no cameras, or equipment of any kind, purses, backpacks, etc. – all must be tucked into lockers before the tours begin.Reservations are a must so check the website to make online future or same day arrangements. For those wanting to experience the cave the way its discoverers did, Helmet and Headlamp tours are also available but only on Saturdays. Kartchner Caverns Park is located near Benson, AZ, about an hour & a half from Tucson. (520) 586-2283

 

Tucson Historic Neighborhoods

Sam Hughes Historic Neighborhood

In 1994 Sam Hughes became one of the official Tucson Historic Neighborhoods; 31 have been designated by the National Register of Historic Places. Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast is a contributing member of this large group of neighborhoods which make up most of the city of Tucson. Many historic neighborhoods received their designations earlier but this one was named to honor the early Tucson settler of the same name.20150518_094907

The neighborhood sits just east of the University of Arizona and is bound by 4 major arteries north & south, Campbell (Kino) Parkway and Country Club Blvd. and on its east and west sides are Speedway & Broadway. Almost 600 homes in the 1 square mile district are considered historically significant and represent 16 essential types of architecture including Craftsman, Bungalow, and Mission Revival. Most have Spanish elements of design.

20150517_182815

It was developed between 1920 and the 1950‘s although there are a few homes of more recent vintage. Settler, Sam Hughes, was instrumental in establishing Tucson’s free public school system and the excellent elementary school also pays tribute by wearing his name.20150518_094826

Although this is basically a residential neighborhood it has enough businesses along its edges to make it a handy walk around neighborhood while still retaining its residential feeling. At least one full service grocery store is close at hand, plus several smaller markets, banks, drugstores and many restaurants.. Highlights are the close-by University of Arizona (with three splendid museums on campus), Himmel Park and a major bike route which cuts through the university from 3rd 20150517_174430Street Blvd. spanning the distance from Wilmot Road on the far east side, to downtown Tucson.

Bus transportation is abundant in all directions and a short walk takes a visitor to the new Streetcar line.Reid/Randolph Park is within walking distance with its tennis courts, heated year round pool, zoo, fountain pond, and picnic sites making the area seem far away from the noise and bustle of the city.

On the other end of the time spectrum of Tucson Historic Neighborhoods is the neighborhood of El Presidio where Tucson began as a Spanish Colonial outpost in 1776, and where most structures date from 1860 to the 1920‘s. Architecture is varied with Transformed Sonoran houses as well as the larger homes which for years were located on what was called Millionaires Row. In the name of “progress”, some mansions in this area were destroyed to make way for major highway construction. But its North Main Avenue is still one of the loveliest streets in town with many beautifully restored buildings serving as homes and offices.Courthouse-Front-11x1-529x360La-Placita-Close-01x-539x360

Early architecture

El Presidiio Neighborhood St. Augustine Cathedral

Sam Hughes is a midtown neighborhood while El Presidio is in downtown Tucson. Check the Tucson Historic Neighborhoods link as well as www.tucsonishome.com for detailed information about the growth of Tucson since 1776 and all the historic neighborhoods that have evolved since then..

 

 

FOOD

Barbecue grillThe University of Arizona School of Anthropology celebrates 100 years since its inception with a series of free food lectures. Sponsored in part by the Marshall Foundation, this series explores the area of food & nutrition and its relationship to man and to our perception of ourselves, as it began thousands of years ago.

Up in Smoke: The History of Barbecue will be presented on Thursday, April 23, 2015, 7:00 – 8:30pm, in Social Sciences 100. This free lecture will be hosted by Steven Raichlen in a keynote address at the University of Arizona Social Science Auditorium. (See university map for locations). Steven Raichlen is an award winning author, journalist, lecturer, TV host & novelist. He has a best selling book and TV shows, Primal Grill & Barbecue University on PBS and he has lectured on the history of barbecue at the Smithsonian, the Library of Congress & Harvard University. So, whatever you think you know about throwing a steak of the grill will pale next to this expert’s bank of cooking knowledge

The Human Appetite: A Symposium on Food and Anthropology will be presented Friday, April 24, 1 – 4pm in Haury 216 (see U of A map). Food is the story of human life and this lecture will explore how we think about food from subsistence strategies to nutrition to the role of food in our daily lives.A panel of graduate students in the School of Anthropology will discuss aspects of “how we are what we eat”. Presentations will include the Heritage of Butchery, Early Roman Animal Sacrifice & Consumption, East African diet and identity, Food Security, White Mountain Apache Food Sovereignty and the Biography of Grain.

10,000 Years of Eating in the Southwest, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 10am – 3pm, Arizona State museum lawn. (See U of A map).This lecture covers the changes in food and eating in the Southwest over the past 10,000 years with demonstration booths staffed by students & faculty of the School of Anthropology.

Food Tour: Local Foods from Tucson’s Past, Saturday, April 25, 2015, 11am – 3pm, departs from Arizona State Museum lawn. Cost $25 per person. Sign up at https://uafoundation.org/NetCommunity/localfoods before 9:00 pm, Thursday, April 23. The tour will visit three locations representing Tucson farmers & their local crops at different points during the past 4,000 years. One is a village site on Tumamoc Hill where Native American farmers raised corn about 400 B.C. Below it are the remains of fields where farmers planted agave & pits where they roasted their harvest in A.D.1250.

You can reach these lectures in about a 20 minute walk from Sam Hughes Inn Bed & Breakfast or park in any of the university garages listed on the map.

Tucson Folk Festival 2015

Folk Music Festival

Tucson Folk Festival 2015

Tucson Folk Festival

May is not the best month for exciting events in Tucson but the 30th annual Tucson Folk Festival ranks near the top of the list for the year. Live music, outside, and presented by the Tucson Kitchen Musicians Association this is one of the largest free festivals in the USA, showcasing at least 120 local, regional and national musicians performing live acoustic music on five stages in downtown Tucson, May 2 & 3, 2015.

Acts will be presented on five stages, the Plaza in El Presidio Park, the Courtyard at the old Pima County Courthouse, in the Museum of Art Courtyard, at La Cocina at Old Town Artisans and in the Patio in front of the Museum of Art.

Ray Wilie Hubbard (songwriter and storyteller), the Ronstadt Generations (5 of them including Michael, younger brother of Linda along with his two sons presenting Southwestern & Mexican songs of their heritage), and Tom Chapin (23 albums, three Grammy Awards and now a children s’ book) will highlight this year’s festival.

Tom Chapin will perform on the Plaza Stage, Saturday, May 2 at PM for an all age audience and will present his children s show on the same stage Sunday, May 3rd from 2-3 PM. Among his many accomplishments he has narrated a series of children’s books, three of which have won Grammy awards in the Best Spoken Word Album for Children category. And he has written his own book for children 4 through 8 years old, called The Backwards Birthday Party.

Ronstadt Generations perform at 7:30 PM, May 2nd on the Plaza stage and Ray Wilie Hubbard will be on the same stage on Sunday, May 3rd at 9 PM. Check the Tucson Folk Festival website for exact times and venues for all the artists as some changes may occur.

Workshops, including Harmony Vocals, Flat-picking & Bluegrass guitar, Story & Song (Tom Chapin), Gospel Sing-A-Long, Mandolin, Banjo, Ukulele and other related instruments & songwriting will be held on both Saturday & Sunday (see schedule on Folk Festival website for locations and times.) A food court and arts & crafts will also be offered during the festival.

If you are a fan of bluegrass and any kind of folk music you won’t want to miss this once a year music extravaganza with performances scheduled from Noon to 7:30 PM on Saturday and from 11 AM to 9 PM on Sunday.

 

 

Tucson Artists’ Open Studios

Tucson Artists’ Open Studios

Tucson Artists' Open Studios

 

The Arts Brigade event,Tucson Artists’ Open Studios comes to town next weekend, April 18 & 19, 2015 from 11AM to 5PM. This annual event will showcase more than 120 artists, and 80 studios and galleries exhibiting the work of these many multi-talented local artists. You don’t have to go to a major US city to find fabulous artistic talent; it’s right here in our own backyards.

Open studio 1

The incredible variety of artistic offerings available include paintings, wooden carvings, ceramics, sculpture, bronze work, historic preservation miniatures, oil paintings, printmaking, photography, intaglio, watercolors, pen & ink drawings, mixed media collage, steel & stainless steel work, clay, glass sculpture, jewelry, paper mâché, pottery, leather work, acrylic on canvas, handwoven wearable art, glass wind chimes, fiber arts, gelatin silver prints, vintage button jewelry, retablos, painted paper castings, graphite on paper, charcoal portraits, note cards, tile furniture and accessories, artisan toys, stone work and artist books. This is a wonderful time to find unique gifts for your own enjoyment or for the special people on your shopping list.

This is your opportunity to talk to the artist whose work you admire and see demonstrations of some of their work. For the tenth year, this artist initiated event invites the visitor into his or her creative space to see what moves them, the type of work they do and of course, to buy some of it..

Most destinations are in downtown Tucson and their locations and the names of all the artists are listed by zip code at TucsonOpenStudios.com. More information and a map for the self guided tour can be found in the April issue of Zocalo Magazine/ on page 21. The magazine, which connects artists to the community can be found free at over 350 locations around the city. Check their website for the digital version or to subscribe to the magazine or to an email list of artistic events throughout the year.

Pink Door Gallery

Art by Ester Rogoway
Old Artisans Shops
Pink Door Gallery

Old Town Artisans , The Pink Door Studio and Gallery, 201 N Court Ave.,Tucson AZ.85701
520-444-6481     estherogoway@gmail.com

The Pink Door Studio and Gallery is a gem found in the heart of the historic Presidio. The Pink Door Studio and Gallery features the finest works of art in original oil, acrylic, watercolor, contemporary sculpture, art glass, ceramics, hand-painted furniture, and exquisite jewelry. The collection includes those with world-renowned reputations as well as cutting edge emerging artists. The Pink Door Gallery and Studio is committed to excellence in its art and in providing you with personal, professional service. Located in The Old Town Artisan building, The Pink Door Studio and Gallery provides a wonderful setting to view one of a kind art and jewelry.

This month , April 18th and 19th, 11:am to 5:00PM, we will be open for The Tucson  Studio Tour.  Please join us for a day of fun and art. Several of our artists will be in attendance, and  demonstrating  their talents. Featured artist: Esther Rogoway 

There will be music and food at  La Cocina Restaurant located on the patio
Seven Galleries and Shops & two Restaurants are located at Old Town Artisans.

 

Tucson Museum of Art Spring Artisans Market

Tucson Museum of Art Spring Artisans Market

Tucson Museum of Art Spring Artisans Market

Spring Artisans Market

Tucson Museum of Art’s Spring Artisans Market is only one reason to visit the museum. The show, held twice yearly in the outdoor areas surrounding the museum, features more than a hundred fine artists and crafts people from all over the Southwest. The spring show will be held March 27, 28 & 29, 2015 and is a “don’t miss” event where you can soak up the fine weather, lunch inside or out at the adorable little Cafe a la C’art, shop for yourself or for gifts and, of course, take in the museum’s permanent and temporary exhibits. Admission is free to the show and to the museum as well. Open 10AM to 5PM.

The museum is located within the Historic Block, formerly part of the original Presidio of Tucson, which includes La Casa Cordoba, J. Knox Corbett House, Edward Nye Fish House, Romero House & Stevens/Duffield House – all wonderful representations of early Tucson architecture.The five properties surround the museum’s more modern building which contains most of its galleries.If you miss the March artisans market, the museum will host another one, called the Holiday Market, in November of 2015.

Gift Shop
A favorite place inside is the museum’s gift shop, full of items you can’t live without. Admission is free and hours are the same as the museum’s. Long time TMA employee, John McNulty, a renowned ceramicist in his own right, is the retail manager of the museum gift shop and responsible for every fabulous item appearing on its shelves, from kitschy small treasures to more expensive pieces of fine Southwest jewelry.

Exhibitions
An upcoming museum exhibition features Surfaces: Photographs by Fritz Kaeser, April 24 to July 5, 2015. Permanent exhibitions include the Art of Latin America, Art of the American West, Modern & Contemporary Art and Rare Books & Manuscripts.

The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday and is located on a full city block within the historic El Presidio district. Its official address is 140 N. Main Avenue and its parking lot is just across the street. Hours are 10AM to 5PM.

Cool Car Visits Sam Hughes Inn

Old Car at Sam Hughes Inn

Very Cool Car

Cool Car Visits Sam Hughes Inn

This fabulous car was parked in front of the Sam Hughes Inn, Saturday, March 7 while its owner went to one of the final Pac12 basketball games at the University of Arizona. “Such a cool car” and just sitting there all by itself. I couldn’t resist going out and taking a picture of it. I think it looks incredible, with red leather roof and interior upholstery and wire rims. It is modeled after a vintage Mercedes but I couldn’t tell if was actually old or a fabulous replica. Either way it was a wonderful addition to the neighborhood and I noticed that people who followed later, parked at a safe distance being very careful not to bump into it.This car makes you want to tie a long scarf around your neck, jump in the driver’s seat and take off!

Whether you’re driving a cool car or not, if you’re in the area attending a game at the University of Arizona, consider staying with us. You can park your car for free and walk to all the games.

Craft Beer Microbreweries

beer

Craft Beer

The first ever, Tucson Craft Beer Crawl, will be held Saturday, February 21, 12 Noon to 4:00 PM and will include 7 Craft Beer Microbreweries representing a number of local craft beers.

There has been an explosion of sorts in microbreweries in Tucson in the past few years and this event will cap Arizona Beer Week (Feb. 12-21).

Tickets can be purchased online for $38 or at the door for $45 and attendees will receive a wristband, a map of participating breweries, and a 5 ounce sampling glass. The goal is to connect beer lovers with local pubs and craft beers unique to Arizona and Tucson.

Per Wikipedia the term “craft beer” is typically applied to breweries that are much smaller than large-scale corporate breweries and are independently owned. Such breweries are generally characterized by their emphasis on quality, flavor and brewing technique Tucson’s participating breweries include Ten 55 Brewing, Borderlands Brewing, Pueblo Vida Brewing, SanTan Brewing, Dragon Brewing Co, Thunder Canyon Brewery, Grand Canyon Brewing Co., Barrio Brewing, Sonoran Brewing Co., Old Bisbee Brewing Co., Huss Brewing, Iron John’s Brew Co, and O.H.S.O. Each company will bring its best brews to sample at Hotel Congress, Thunder Canyon Brewery, R Bar, Pueblo Vida, Playground, Borderlands Brewery and Tap & Bottle.

The hope is that people will develop a sense of community in the new downtown neighborhood while enjoying a moving party. Some of the proceeds will be donated to Watershed Management Group, an organization offering “adaptive & collaborative approach to developing sustainable solutions for the water and environmental issues in Tucson” (Zócalo Magazine, February, 2015).

The afternoon timing will insure that the beer crawl becomes a real community event with people coming together to discover downtown and hopefully bring their friends to enjoy some of the local pubs as well. Coincidentally a bill will be introduced in the upcoming Arizona legislative session to allow microbreweries to keep restaurants and pubs as they grow.

The current law says breweries producing less than 40,000 barrels a year are “microbreweries.” Once they top that number, they become “producers.” As a microbrewery they are allowed some self-distribution rights and the operation of restaurants and pubs and some of these smaller places would like to expand. The Arizona Craft Brewers Guild says the law is not clear regarding off-site restaurants and pubs when a brewer tops 40,000 barrels. Tucson brewers currently have on site restaurant/pub arrangements but could be affected by this law in the future. Arizona Beer Week happens every February from Flagstaff to Tucson and is a celebration of craft beer throughout the state.The Great Tucson Beer Festival is tentatively scheduled October 31, 2015.

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